The 33rd annual National Cancer Survivors Day is celebrated on Sunday, June 7, 2020. Sponsored by the National Cancer Survivors Day Foundation (NCSD), it is a time-honored Celebration of Life that gives everyone who is living with a history of cancer an opportunity to connect with other cancer survivors, celebrate milestones, and recognize those who have supported them along the way. Cancer is a group of diseases characterized by the uncontrolled growth and spread of abnormal cells and it is regarded as an evolving major health problem globally. Cancer can spread throughout your body resulting in tumors, damage to the immune system and other impairment that could be fatal. There are more than 100 types of cancers that include breast cancer, skin cancer, lung cancer, colon cancer, prostate cancer, and lymphoma. Oncologists treating this condition can rely on professional medical billing outsourcing companies to meet their timely documentation and claim submission requirements.

Cancer is not as fatal as it was earlier. Treatment is getting more effective, and there are groups around the world that get together to help the cancer patient and their families make it through the very long and hard road of treatment and recovery.

The nonprofit National Cancer Survivors Day Foundation is one such group that works to improve the quality of life of cancer survivors. They provide free guidance, education, and networking to hundreds of hospitals, support groups, and other cancer-related organizations that host NCSD events in their communities. According to the National Cancer Survivors Day Foundation’s administrator for the celebration, “A ‘survivor’ is anyone living with a history of cancer – from the moment of diagnosis through the remainder of life.”

An annual worldwide Celebration of Life that is held on the first Sunday in June, the National Cancer Survivors Day was initially announced by Merril Hastings at the second national conference meeting of the National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship in Albuquerque, New Mexico on November 20, 1987. As part of the celebration every year, tens of thousands of people across the globe gather in their local communities to celebrate the day. The campaign encourages everyone including cancer survivors, caregivers, healthcare professionals, family members, and friends to join the worldwide celebration.

However, due to COVID-19, many of the public events scheduled to celebrate National Cancer Survivors Day® have been cancelled. But you can connect with cancer survivors and supporters around the world on Sunday, June 7, by using the hashtag #NCSD2020 and following National Cancer Survivors Day® on Facebook (Facebook.com/CancerSurvivorsDay), Instagram (@cancersurvivorsday), and Twitter (@survivorsday). Many communities and cancer organizations are taking their NCSD celebrations online or hosting socially distanced events. According to NCSD, “with nearly 17 million people living with and beyond cancer in the U.S. today – and more than 32 million cancer survivors worldwide – everyone knows someone whose life has been touched by cancer”. The numbers reflect great success, and the survival rate gets higher with every passing year.

For those looking up NCSD celebrations in social media, here is a suggested post for your social media sites by NCSD foundation: “Life after cancer is something worth celebrating. And a better quality of life for ALL cancer survivors is worth fighting for. Let’s #CelebrateLife and raise awareness of the challenges of cancer survivorship on National Cancer Survivors Day, June 7. #NCSD2020”.

In addition to facing a serious illness, cancer survivors must cope with rapidly rising drug costs, inadequate insurance coverage, difficulty finding or keeping employment, and ongoing physical, psychological, and financial struggles that persist even after treatment ends. Physicians treating cancer patients must correctly document the symptoms, screening tests and other treatment procedures offered using the correct diagnosis codes. This is important both from the point of view of patient care as well as reimbursement. Medical billing services provided by reputable billing and coding companies can help in timely claim submissions for accurate reimbursement.

ICD-10 codes used for different types of cancers include:

  • C00-C14: Malignant neoplasms of lip, oral cavity and pharynx
  • C15-C26: Malignant neoplasms of digestive organs
  • C30-C39: Malignant neoplasms of respiratory and intrathoracic organs
  • C40-C41: Malignant neoplasms of bone and articular cartilage
  • C43-C44: Melanoma and other malignant neoplasms of skin
  • C45-C49: Malignant neoplasms of mesothelial and soft tissue
  • C50-C50: Malignant neoplasms of breast
  • C51-C58: Malignant neoplasms of female genital organs
  • C60-C63: Malignant neoplasms of male genital organs
  • C64-C68: Malignant neoplasms of urinary tract
  • C69-C72: Malignant neoplasms of eye, brain and other parts of central nervous system
  • C73-C75: Malignant neoplasms of thyroid and other endocrine glands
  • C76-C80: Malignant neoplasms of ill-defined, other secondary and unspecified sites
  • C7A-C7A: Malignant neuroendocrine tumors
  • C7B-C7B: Secondary neuroendocrine tumors
  • C81-C96: Malignant neoplasms of lymphoid, hematopoietic and related tissue
  • D00-D09: In situ neoplasms
  • D10-D36: Benign neoplasms, except benign neuroendocrine tumors
  • D37-D48: Neoplasms of uncertain behavior, polycythemia vera and myelodysplastic syndromes
  • D3A-D3A: Benign neuroendocrine tumors
  • D49-D49: Neoplasms of unspecified behavior

The NCSD Foundation, along with NCSD 2020 national supporters Agios, Amgen, Bluebird Bio, Coping with Cancer magazine, Exelixis, and Janssen Biotech, is encouraging citizens across the globe to stand with these survivors on National Cancer Survivors Day® and make a commitment to address the challenges of cancer survival. The effort is to ensure that cancer survivors are not forgotten once active treatment ends.