Documenting Atherosclerosis Cardiovascular Disease with ICD-10 Code

Documenting Atherosclerosis Cardiovascular Disease with ICD-10 Code

Atherosclerosis is a serious cardiovascular condition wherein the arteries are clogged with fatty substances called plaques, or atheroma. Health practices are required to give immediate patient care as atherosclerosis leads to life-threatening problems like heart attacks or strokes. If the patient is not promptly treated, the condition can worsen. Against this backdrop, it is essential that health practices rely upon thoracic and cardiovascular surgery medical billing services to appropriately assign ICD-10 codes based on accurately prepared clinical documentation. This aids practices in the efficient management of the revenue cycle as well.

ICD-10 Codes

✥  I70: Atherosclerosis

  • I70.0: Atherosclerosis of aorta
  • I70.1: Atherosclerosis of renal artery

➣ I70.2: Atherosclerosis of native arteries of the extremities

  • I70.20: Unspecified atherosclerosis of native arteries of extremities
  • I70.21: Atherosclerosis of native arteries of extremities with intermittent claudication
  • I70.22: Atherosclerosis of native arteries of extremities with rest pain
  • I70.23: Atherosclerosis of native arteries of right leg with ulceration
  • I70.24: Atherosclerosis of native arteries of left leg with ulceration
  • I70.25: Atherosclerosis of native arteries of other extremities with ulceration
  • I70.26: Atherosclerosis of native arteries of extremities with gangrene
  • I70.29: Other atherosclerosis of native arteries of extremities

➣ I70.3: Atherosclerosis of unspecified type of bypass graft (s) of the extremities

  • I70.30: Unspecified atherosclerosis of unspecified type of bypass graft(s) of the extremities
  • I70.31: Atherosclerosis of unspecified type of bypass graft(s) of the extremities with intermittent claudication.
  • I70.32: Atherosclerosis of unspecified type of bypass graft(s) of the extremities with rest pain
  • I70.33: Atherosclerosis of unspecified type of bypass graft(s) of the right leg with ulceration
  • I70.34: Atherosclerosis of unspecified type of bypass graft (s) of the left leg with ulceration
  • I70.35: Atherosclerosis of unspecified type of bypass graft(s) of other extremity with ulceration
  • I70.36: Atherosclerosis of unspecified type of bypass graft(s) of the extremities with gangrene
  • I70.39: Other atherosclerosis of unspecified type of bypass graft(s) of the extremities

➣ I70.4: Atherosclerosis of autologous vein bypass graft (s) of the extremities

  • I70.40: Unspecified atherosclerosis of autologous vein bypass graft (s) of the extremities
  • I70.41: Atherosclerosis of autologous vein bypass graft(s) of the extremities with intermittent claudication
  • I70.42: Atherosclerosis of autologous vein bypass graft (s) of the extremities with rest pain
  • I70.43: Atherosclerosis of autologous vein bypass graft(s) of the right leg with ulceration
  • I70.44: Atherosclerosis of autologous vein bypass graft(s) of the left leg with ulceration
  • I70.45: Atherosclerosis of autologous vein bypass graft(s) of other extremity with ulceration
  • I70.46: Atherosclerosis of autologous vein bypass graft (s) of the extremities with gangrene
  • I70.49: Other atherosclerosis of autologous vein bypass graft(s) of the extremities

➣ I70.5: Atherosclerosis of nonautologous biological bypass graft(s) of the extremities

  • I70.50: Unspecified atherosclerosis of nonautologous biological bypass graft(s) of the extremities
  • I70.51: Atherosclerosis of nonautologous biological bypass graft(s) of the extremities intermittent claudication
  • I70.52: Atherosclerosis of nonautologous biological bypass graft(s) of the extremities with rest pain
  • I70.53: Atherosclerosis of nonautologous biological bypass graft(s) of the right leg with ulceration
  • I70.54: Atherosclerosis of nonautologous biological bypass graft(s) of the left leg with ulceration
  • I70.55: Atherosclerosis of nonautologous biological bypass graft(s) of other extremity with ulceration
  • I70.56: Atherosclerosis of nonautologous biological bypass graft(s) of the extremities with gangrene
  • I70.59: Other atherosclerosis of nonautologous biological bypass graft(s) of the extremities

➣ I70.6: Atherosclerosis of nonbiological bypass graft(s) of the extremities

  • I70.60: Unspecified atherosclerosis of nonbiological bypass graft(s) of the extremities
  • I70.61: Atherosclerosis of nonbiological bypass graft (s) of the extremities with intermittent
  • I70.62: Atherosclerosis of nonbiological bypass graft(s) of the extremities with rest pain
  • I70.63: Atherosclerosis of nonbiological bypass graft(s) of the right leg with ulceration
  • I70.64: Atherosclerosis of nonbiological bypass graft(s) of the left leg with ulceration
  • I70.65: Atherosclerosis of nonbiological bypass graft(s) of other extremity with ulceration
  • I70.66: Atherosclerosis of nonbiological bypass graft(s) of the extremities with gangrene
  • I70.69: Other atherosclerosis of nonbiological bypass graft(s) of the extremities

➣ I70.7: Atherosclerosis of other type of bypass graft(s) of the extremities

  • I70.70: Unspecified atherosclerosis of other type of bypass graft(s) of the extremities
  • I70.71: Atherosclerosis of other type of bypass graft(s) of the extremities with intermittent claudication
  • I70.72: Atherosclerosis of other type of bypass graft(s) of the extremities with rest pain
  • I70.73: Atherosclerosis of other type of bypass graft(s) of the right leg with ulceration
  • I70.74: Atherosclerosis of other type of bypass graft(s) of the left leg with ulceration
  • I70.75: Atherosclerosis of other type of bypass graft(s) of other extremity with ulceration
  • I70.76: Atherosclerosis of other type of bypass graft(s) of the extremities with gangrene
  • I70.79: Other atherosclerosis of other type of bypass graft(s) of the extremities

➣ I70.8: Atherosclerosis of other arteries

➣ I70.9: Other and unspecified atherosclerosis

Cardiology billing and coding experiences regular amendments of key procedure rules. Medical billing and coding services focus on ensuring accurate codes by staying up to date with new, deleted, and revised cardiology codes. This completely eliminates the chances of claim denial. In addition, the highest degree of specificity is ensured in a cost-effective manner.

What Is Retro Authorization in Medical Billing?

What Is Retro Authorization in Medical Billing?

Medical billing companies continuously work to help physicians reduce claim denials and improve the patient experience with proven strategies such as insurance verification and preauthorization services. Health plans use prior authorization to determine if a prescribed product or service will be covered. Insurance verification specialists help healthcare providers navigate this time consuming and tedious process by verifying patient coverage before a specific service is delivered and obtaining approval from a health plan. This also helps patients get the care they need without delay.

Retro authorization Explained

Prior or pre-authorization involves obtaining approval for the patient’s services prior to rendering them. Many insurers require that authorization for services be obtained prior to or within 14 calendar days of services rendered.

Now, what if the provider could not obtain a pre-authorization before services are delivered?

In rare exceptions and emergencies when preauthorization is not possible, retro authorization approval requests will come into play. Retroactive authorization refers to requests made to the insurance company for approval after patient’s treatment has been provided and the specified period of time has ended.

Retroactive authorizations are given when the patient is in a state (unconscious) or under other extenuating circumstances where necessary medical information cannot be obtained for preauthorization. Retroactive authorization requests may also be used when:

  • the healthcare provider lacks time to obtain prior authorization
  • if a claim is denied based on medical necessity

Insurance providers have rules as to when the retro-authorization request must be sent. For e.g., Beacon Health Options requires that that request must be received in writing no later than forty-five (45) calendar days from the date of service. After the provider submits the retro authorization request, the payer will reimburse the claim based on their standard guidelines.

There are many concerns associated with retroactive authorizations:

  • If a provider makes a mistake and fails to get preauthorization, there is no guarantee that the payer will issue a retro authorization.
  • A denial may be overturned on appeal but payer rules on the retro-authorization process may change and they are under no obligation to make payment if their guidelines were not followed.

Insurance verification and authorization companies stay updated on such changes to help practices that help practices manage the retro-authorization request process efficiently.

Importance of Documentation of “Valid Circumstances”

Retro-authorization requests should be made through the standard authorization request channels – phone, fax, or payer portal. The provider should be explicitly mention in the submission that they are making a retro-authorization request.

Retroactive authorizations are subject to medical necessity review which seeks to confirm that the care was appropriate and was provided at the most efficient and effective level. When making the Retro-authorization request:

  • Providers should ensure documentation of the valid circumstances under which the retro authorization request was made. Most payers will not retroactively authorize routine services except with documentation of valid circumstances. For instance, qualifications for retro-authorization/valid extenuating circumstances set down in a 2018 Nebraska Total Care retro authorization process update were:
    • Services authorized by another payor who subsequently determined the member was not eligible for the services or was not eligible with the payer at the time the services were rendered
    • Member received retro-eligibility from the Department of Health and Human Services, Division of Medicaid and Long-Term Care
    • Services occurred during a transition of care period between two Heritage Health Managed Care Organizations
    • Member was not capable of providing insurance information due to incapacitation
  • Ensure that the codes used to describe the care listed on the submitted bill are coded correctly in accordance with CPT and ICD-10 guidelines.
  • Meet the payer’s timely filing guidelines for claims associated with services subject to retro-authorization.

The request for a retro-authorization only guarantees consideration of the request. Retro-authorizations that are not approved upon review may be appealed.

Outsource Insurance Verification and Authorization – Streamline the Predetermination Process

Managing the challenges of prior authorization and retro authorization processes would be much easier with support from an insurance verification company. Experienced insurance verification specialists call insurance companies and get authorizations in a timely and efficient manner. They will verify if a particular medical procedure is covered and obtain prior approval from the payer to ensure timely and appropriate reimbursement. Leading insurance authorization companies are knowledgeable about government and private insurance guidelines and will ensure that claim requests are submitted with correct information. They work to streamline the prior authorization process, get quick prior approval, and reduce risk of errors and delays. With experts handling these challenging and time-consuming processes, providers can focus on patient care.

Key Tips for Choosing the Right Medical Billing and Coding Company

Key Tips for Choosing the Right Medical Billing and Coding Company

The revenue cycle management (RCM) process comprises many complex components – from patient scheduling and registration and insurance verification to medical billing and coding and claim submission. Dealing with these tasks along with patient care delivery is not easy for medical practices and many are choosing to outsource RCM tasks. An experienced medical billing and coding company can help practices navigate their way through the challenges of complex billing and coding requirements, payer rules and evolving regulatory requirements. Partnering with a professional, HIPAA compliant medical billing and coding company can help physicians and their staff to focus on care and improving the patient experience. Today, outsourcing medical billing is proving the best option for physician offices, family practices, clinics, and hospitals to manage their billing and coding tasks.

Medical billing outsourcing provides diverse benefits for practices such as –

  • Providers and front office staff get more time to focus on patients
  • Increased cash flow
  • Billing compliance
  • Reduced risk of billing and coding errors
  • Appropriate and timely reimbursement
  • Increase patient satisfaction

According to a Grand View Research report, the global medical billing outsourcing market size which was valued at USD 10.2 billion in 2020 is expected to expand at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 12.66% from 2021 to 2028. Key factors driving the market include the increasing usage of billing and medical coding procedures in revenue cycle management and frequent revisions in the classification systems for medical coding. The front-end component of RCM consists of patient scheduling and registration, insurance eligibility verification and pre-authorization services. Back-end RCM components comprise medical coding and billing which covers charge posting, claim review and submission, payment posting, AR (accounts receivable) management and collections.

Key factors to look into for a medical billing company

Consider experience in your speciality

Consider the company’s experience, especially in medical billing for your speciality. Different specialities come with their own unique billing and coding challenges. Make sure the team can meet the claim submission requirements of your speciality. Check customer testimonials on the company’s website.

Availability of expert resources

Make sure that the company’s team includes billing and coding specialists who are AHIMA or AAPC certified. They need to be familiar with the coding and billing rules, terminologies and all conditions, diagnosis and treatment procedures related to your speciality.

Billing and coding training

Make sure the company provides regular training for their staff. The team must have good knowledge about current ICD, CPT, HCPCS and CDT coding and be up-to-date on industry guidelines and regulations.

Look for comprehensive medical billing services

Choose a medical billing company that will handle all aspects of revenue cycle management — from patient appointment scheduling to claims submission, collections, and AR follow-up. Also, find out how quickly they will begin processing claims.

HIPAA compliance

Patient data security is a major concern for any healthcare practice. And so, make sure that the company you are partnering with is HIPAA compliant. This is important to ensure the confidentiality of sensitive patient data and prevent personal health information (PHI) from getting into the wrong hands. Enquire about the company’s data security policies and the processes they use to make sure your information is protected.

Assess cost before signing up

Make sure you know how the billing company charges for its services. Evaluate their budget and ensure there are no hidden fees before you sign up.

Check how insurance verification is performed

The company should have an experienced team of dedicated insurance verification specialists with excellent skills in verifying patient eligibility for all specialities. The team must be able to confirm insurance eligibility ahead of the patient visit.

Denial management support

Denied claims are a key concern for hospitals, health systems and physician practices. The medical billing company you partner with must provide proper claims denials management and prevention strategies to reduce denials and increase the success rate of claims appeals.

Technology

Technology is another important factor to consider when choosing a medical billing service provider. The company must be able to work with your software or use its own software to manage the billing process.

Managing billing, coding, claims submission, AR management and other related tasks in-house can be time-consuming, difficult and costly. Experienced medical billing companies can help practices manage these tasks efficiently, reduce denials and maximize revenue.
 
 

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Manual Therapy Techniques – How to Bill for Medicare/Major Medical Insurances

Manual Therapy Techniques – How to Bill for Medicare/Major Medical Insurances

Manual therapy is an effective option that is widely used by physical therapists, massage therapists, chiropractors, and osteopaths to treat pain and musculoskeletal disorders. As therapists work to rehabilitate patients, they can rely on experienced providers of physical therapy and chiropractic billing services to file accurate claims. Having a clear understanding of how to bill private insurance and Medicare is essential to receive payment for manual therapy services.

Defining Manual Therapy Techniques 

Manual therapy techniques are used to treat the restricted motion of soft tissues in the extremities, neck, and trunk. They include a wide range of hands-on and physical treatments such as massage and manipulation of muscles, and techniques to mobilize joints and promote functional recovery.

The American Academy of Orthopaedic Manual Physical Therapists (AAOMPT) Description of Advanced Specialty Practice (DASP) (2018) defines orthopaedic manual physical therapy (OMPT) as: “An advanced speciality area of physical therapy practice that is based on manual examination and treatment techniques integrated with exercise, patient education, and other physical therapy modalities to address pain, loss of function, and wellness”.

Manual therapy is widely used in the management of upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders. Techniques Include

  • Massage
  • Massage
  • Traction
  • Trigger Point Therapy
  • Active Release Techniques
  • Assisted Active Range of Motion (AAROM)
  • Passive Range of Motion
  • Lymph Drainage
  • Stretches (muscle, neural tissue, joints, fascia)
  • Instrument Assisted Soft Tissue Mobilization
  • Joint Manipulation
  • Joint Mobilization 

Billing Medicare for Manual Therapies 

Medicare covers multiple manual therapy techniques with proper documentation. Manual therapy is reported using CPT code 97140. 

CPT code 97140 – Manual Therapy Techniques (e.g., mobilization/manipulation, manual lymphatic drainage, manual traction), 1 or more regions, every 15 minutes. It also includes myofascial release/soft tissue mobilization.

Descriptors of manual therapy:

  • Manual therapy is used in an active and/or passive fashion to help effect changes in the soft tissues, articular structures, and neural or vascular systems.
  • The intent of the service is to increase pain-free range of motion and facilitate a return to functional activities.
  • An example is the facilitation of fluid exchange, restoration of movement in acutely edematous muscles, or stretching of shortened connective tissue.
  • Manual therapy is used when a loss of motor ability impedes function. 

CPT codes 98940-98943 – Chiropractic Manipulative Treatment (CMT)

CMT is a form of manual treatment to influence joint and neurophysiological function and can be provided using different techniques. Here are the conditions for Medicare coverage for CMT (as listed by United Healthcare Medicare Advantage):

  • Coverage of chiropractic service is specifically limited to treatment by means of manual manipulation of the spine to correct a subluxation (that is, by use of the hands)
  • The patient must require treatment by means of manual manipulation of the spine to correct subluxation and the manipulative services rendered must have a direct therapeutic relationship to the patient’s condition and provide reasonable expectations of recovery or improvement of function.
  • Manual devices may be used by chiropractors for manual manipulation of the spine, but Medicare does not recognize an extra charge for the device itself.
  • No other diagnostic or therapeutic service furnished by a chiropractor or under the chiropractor’s order is covered.

The following CPT codes are covered by Medicare

98940 Chiropractic manipulative treatment (CMT); spinal, 1-2 regions

98941 Chiropractic manipulative treatment (CMT); spinal, 3-4 regions

98942 Chiropractic manipulative treatment (CMT); spinal, 5 regions

Medicare does not reimburse code 98943 Chiropractic manipulative treatment (CMT); extraspinal, 1 or more regions

When submitting the claim:

  • Use modifier AT – Acute treatment when reporting service 98940, 98941, and 98942
  • Include the following information –
  • The primary diagnosis of subluxation
  • The initial visit or the date of exacerbation of the existing condition
  • The CPT code (98940, 98941, 98942) that best describes the service
  • The appropriate modifier that describes the services

Note: The National Correct Coding Initiative (NCCI) edits created by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) require that the manual therapy techniques be performed in a separate anatomic site than the chiropractic adjustments in order to be reimbursed separately. Both codes could be billed if all conditions are met:

  • Documentation should support medical necessity for the use of both CPT codes
  • For the timed manual therapy CPT code, the service has to be performed for a minimum of 8 minutes to bill one unit.
  • Modifier 59 should be appended to 97140 to indicate that it is a distinct procedure and is performed at a different anatomic region than the chiropractic adjustment that day.

Commercial Insurance Coverage for Manual Therapy 

Private insurers have specific coverage rules and documentation requirements for different types of manual therapies. Let’s take a look at Optum’s policy on manual therapy.

Optum’s definition of Manual Therapy is adapted from the American Academy of Orthopedic Manual Physical Therapy (AAOMPT) and American Physical Therapy Association (APTA): A clinical approach utilizing skilled, specific hands-on techniques, including but not limited to manipulation/mobilization, used by the clinician to diagnose and treat soft tissues and joint structures for the purpose of modulating pain; increasing range of motion (ROM); reducing or eliminating soft tissue inflammation; inducing relaxation; improving contractile and non-contractile tissue repair, extensibility, and/or stability; facilitating movement; and improving function.

Conditions for coverage of soft-tissue and joint manual therapy techniques:

  • Broadly, manual therapy is indicated when there is mechanically induced musculoskeletal pain ie, pain that is provoked and relieved by specific motions or positions
  • Criteria that are important for the correct application of manual therapy include: specificity of the procedure; direction and amount of force; the duration, type, and irritability of symptoms; and patient and clinician position
  • CPT codes covered: 97140, 98940, 98941, 98942 and 98943

Optum states that code 97140 (Manual therapy techniques) may be billed on the same date of service as a CMT code when the manual therapy service is provided to a different, noncontiguous body region than the CMT.

An article in chiro.eco notes that Optum clarifies contiguous and non-contiguous body regions and notes that treatment of contiguous structures in the same organ or anatomic region does not constitute treatment of different anatomic sites. [NCCI, 2017]. For instance, the policy notes that the treatment of myofascial structures using manual therapy techniques in the same organ (spine), where CMT was performed and was contiguous (cervical and thoracic), does not constitute treatment of different anatomic sites.

The treatment of myofascial structures using manual therapy techniques in the same organ (spine), where CMT was performed and was not contiguous (cervical and lumbar), does constitute treatment of different anatomic sites. 

Documentation Requirements 

Optum requires documentation of the following criteria to support the clinical necessity of manual therapy services:

  • The clinical indication and appropriateness of the selected manual therapy technique, including the need for skilled care services for treating a musculoskeletal condition
  • The clinical rationale for a separate and identifiable service must be documented when both CPT code 97140 and a CMT procedural code are reported on the same date
  • Description of the manual therapy technique e.g., joint manipulation, myofascial release, mobilization, etc.
  • Location e.g., spinal region(s), shoulder, thigh, etc.
  • Time (applicable only to CPT code 97140, which includes a timed-therapy services requirement)

Manual therapy is often used in a multimodal approach that focuses on the recovery of the patient’s functional capabilities. All therapy services are generally covered based on the duration and intensity appropriate to the severity of the impairment and the patient’s response to treatment. The patient’s needs, course of therapy and response to therapy must be documented for each date of service. Billing manual therapy is challenging as payer rules and guidelines differ. Support from experienced chiropractic and physical therapy medical billing service provider can go a long way in overcoming these challenges.

Importance of CPT Modifier 58 in Medical Billing

Importance of CPT Modifier 58 in Medical Billing

Modifiers are an important element in medical billing. A modifier offers physicians a way to report or indicate that a service or procedure has been performed and altered by some specific circumstance but not changed in definition. A modifier also provides additional information about the medical procedure, service, or supply in question without altering the meaning of the code. Carriers have specific rules on modifiers. Missing or incorrectly used modifiers can result in denied or rejected claims. Medical billing outsourcing to an expert can ensure the accurate use of modifiers to meet payer requirements.

There are many CPT modifiers and practitioners may be confused when it comes to choosing the right option for billing purposes. Here, we are going to discuss when modifier 58 should be used in medical billing and coding.

When to Submit Modifier 58

 The definition of Modifier 58 is: Staged or related procedure or service by the same physician during the postoperative period.
From the definition, it is clear that this is a surgical-specific modifier. CPT modifier 58 should be reported when a procedure or service performed during the postoperative period meets one of the following conditions:

  • Is planned or anticipated at the time of the original procedure (staged)
  • Is more extensive than the original procedure, or
  • Is for the therapy following a surgical procedure

Let’s look at three scenarios where the use of modifier 58 would be appropriate.

Example 1:  Revenue Cycle Advisor provides the following example (for professional fee billing) of a staged or planned procedure:

“A patient with diabetes and advanced circulatory problems came in for a surgical procedure to have a gangrenous toe removed from her left foot. On the day of the procedure, the physician let the patient know that her condition was progressing and that she may need to have her left foot amputated. A couple of weeks later, the physician performed an amputation of the patient’s left foot”.

Here, the second procedure was planned prospectively. A podiatry medical billing and coding company will report these services using the following codes and modifier 58:

  • 28820, amputation, toe; metatarsophalangeal joint
  • 28805-58, amputation, foot; transmetatarsal

 Example 2: The following example provided by Palmetto GBA is of a procedure that is more extensive than the original procedure:

“A right breast lesion removal (CPT code 19125) is performed on May 1 and was positive for cancer. On May 8, (within the global period of the previous surgery), a modified radical mastectomy including axillary lymph nodes, with or without pectoralis minor muscle (CPT code 19307) was performed”.

Since the mastectomy procedure was a more extensive procedure than the lesion removal, it should be reported with modifier 58 and the following code:

  • 19307-58

Example 3: Here’s another example from MedPro Disposal:

A surgical procedure is performed to debride a sacral ulcer. During the procedure, the surgeon knows a skin graft has to be performed on the ulcer site at a later date. As the surgeon anticipated the need for the skin graft at the time of the original procedure, the grafting must be billed with modifier 58.

When Submitting Modifier 58 is not Appropriate

Do not submit modifier 58 for the following:

  • E/M – Evaluation and Management
  • If the second procedure is unrelated
  • If the second procedure is performed by a surgeon of a different speciality/different provider group
  • For assistant surgery services (global surgery rules do not apply to assistants)
  • If the procedure is not performed in the post-operative period
  • If the procedure was not staged/planned at the time of the first procedure

There is often some confusion about Modifiers 58 78, and 79.  Though they apply to certain procedures that are performed within the “global period” of another procedure, and are very similar in definition, these three CPT modifiers are distinct in their scope and usage.

  • Modifier 58 applies to a “more extensive” procedure or staged procedure or service performed in the post-surgical period by the same physician.
  • Modifier 78 applies when an unplanned return to the operating room/procedure room occurs due to complications following the original surgery.
  • Modifier 79 is appended to report an unrelated procedure or service is performed by the same physician during the postoperative period.

Importance of Clear Documentation

Proper use of modifiers can help ensure accurate reimbursement for procedures performed. Clear, authoritative medical record documentation is essential to convey to the payers as to why modifier 58 was appended, and help prevent questions or delayed payment from payers. As a matter of fact, this applies to all CPT modifiers. Documentation must show that the two services were separate and distinct and support everything done by the physician. Clear documentation is also essential to understand when a modifier is needed. Skilled coders in a medical billing and coding company will be knowledgeable about payers’ specific rules with regard to the use of modifiers.

Coding Common Women’s Health Issues This Women’s Day

Coding Common Women’s Health Issues This Women’s Day

Happy Women’s Day 2022!

Each year, International Women’s day is celebrated on March 8. This year’s theme for the day is – “Gender equality today for a sustainable tomorrow”.  Unlike men, women experience unique health issues and conditions, including pregnancy and menopause to breast cancer and other gynecological conditions. Some health issues that affect both men and women can affect women differently. However, with on-time diagnosis and proper treatment, most conditions are preventable. Treatments provided by gynecologists or other providers need to be reported accurately on the medical claims, for which gynecologists can rely on professional medical coding companies.

Coding Common Women’s Health Issues This Women’s Day

Coding women’s complex health issues and conditions require expertise. Experienced medical billing outsourcing companies provide comprehensive medical billing and coding services for medical practices.