What Are the Key Medical Coding Terms and Vocabulary to Know?

What Are the Key Medical Coding Terms and Vocabulary to Know?

On-time reimbursement from insurers for any medical specialties mainly requires the services of skilled medical coders and billing specialists. They must be knowledgeable in the medical coding terminology that includes the names of conditions and illnesses, treatments and medications or procedures and vocabulary related to medical codes. An experienced medical billing and coding company in the U.S., our team is up to date with the changing coding standards. They are familiar with the coding and billing terminologies and vocabulary, diseases and their diagnosis, and treatment options.

Check out some medical coding vocabulary & key terms:

CPT

Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) is a medical code set to report medical, surgical, and diagnostic procedures and services. These codes are also used for administrative management purposes such as claims processing and developing guidelines for medical care review.

The CPT code set is divided into three Categories. Category I codes that describe medical procedures, technologies and services have descriptors that correspond to a procedure or service. Category II includes supplemental codes for performance management, and Category III is temporary alphanumeric codes for new and developing technology, procedures and services.

ICD

ICD or International Classification of Disease codes help classify diseases, injuries, and causes of death. These codes ensure proper treatment and correct charges for any medical services provided.

The ICD code set is maintained by the World Health Organization (WHO) and distributed in countries across the globe. In the U.S., ICD codes are overseen by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).The latest version of the ICD, ICD-11 came into effect on 1st January 2022.

When the healthcare provider submits claims to an insurance company for reimbursement, each service is described by a CPT code, which is matched to an ICD code. If the two codes don’t align each other, the company may deny payment.

HCPCS

Maintained by CMS, Healthcare Common Procedure Coding System (HCPCS) is a collection of standardized codes that represent medical procedures, supplies, products and services. The codes are used to facilitate the processing of health insurance claims by Medicare and other insurers.

HCPCS is divided into two subsystems, Level I and Level II. Level I HCPCS includes Current Procedural Terminology codes (CPT) for hospital providers, which consists of five numeric digits. Level II HCPCS codes include a letter followed by four numeric digits. These codes are used to report non-physician services like ambulance rides, wheelchairs, walkers, durable medical equipment, and other medical services. HCPCS codes include A-codes, C-codes, G-codes, J-codes, and Q-codes.

Evaluation and Management Codes

Evaluation and Management, or E&M codes are used to describe the assessment of a patient’s health and the management of their care. Reviewed on a periodic basis by the AMA, Evaluation and management codes are a part of the CPT-4 system. E&M codes range from 99201 – 99499.

Modifiers

Modifiers are two-character codes that are added to a CPT® or HCPCS Level II code to report any necessary changes in the definition of the procedure. CPT codes have numeric modifiers, while HCPCS codes have alphanumeric modifiers. Modifiers are added at the end of a code with a hyphen. It provides additional information about the medical procedure, service, or supply involved without changing the meaning of the code.

Listen to our podcast –
CPT Code Modifiers and How They are Used

Upcoding and downcoding

Upcoding is coding or reporting for a higher-level service or procedure than what is actually done, to increase the reimbursement rate. At the same time, downcoding is using a code that is of less dollar value than the actual procedure performed.

Also Read –
Bundling And Downcoding Issues In Dental Billing And How To Address Them

Z-codes

When used right, Z codes can improve claims accuracy and specificity, and help to establish medical necessity for treatment. These codes, found in Chapter 21: Factors Influencing Health Status and Contact with Health Services (Z00-Z99) of the ICD-10-CM code book, can be used in any healthcare setting. Z-codes describe circumstances outside of injury or disease that cause a patient to visit a health professional.

The Z codes (Z00-Z99) provide descriptions for a situation wherein the symptoms a patient displays do not point to a specific disorder but still warrant treatment.

Appeal

When an insurer denies payment for any treatment provided, providers can appeal by objecting to the decision made and requesting to re-consider the claim.

Billing specialists at reliable medical coding companies can ensure that your practice has only fewer accounts receivable and unresolved dental claims.

Read our blog on –
Handling Dental Claim Denials or Rejections – How to Appeal

AR (Accounts Receivable)

In medical billing, accounts receivable refers to the outstanding reimbursement owed to providers for issued treatments and services, whether the financial responsibility falls to the patient or their insurance company.

AR management is a collection of processes such as identifying denied/unpaid claims, re-filing the corrected claims, minimizing AR days, and eliminating aged AR.

Advance Beneficiary Notice (ABN)

ABN isa notice given by a doctor or a supplier to Original Medicare beneficiaries to convey that Medicare is not likely to provide coverage in a specific case. It is used to get reimbursement for the services provided to the beneficiary of the Original Medicare Plan.

Explanation of Benefits (EOB)

An Explanation of Benefit (EOB) refers to a statement generated by a health insurance provider describing what costs they will cover for the medical care received by the patient. The EOB is generated when the provider submits a claim for the services rendered.

Medical coding and billing specialists play a key role in evaluating medical records and Charge Tickets to ensure completeness, accuracy, and compliance with the right ICD and CPT codes as well as correct modifiers. They should have good knowledge in medical terminologies, anatomy and physiology details, and state and federal Medicare reimbursement guidelines. Professional medical billing and coding companies providing medical coding services will make sure to provide their staff regular training in all regards.

What is the Difference between Insurance Verification and Insurance Authorization?

What is the Difference between Insurance Verification and Insurance Authorization?

Revenue cycle management (RCM) is the administration of financial transactions that result from the medical encounters between a patient and a provider, facility, and/or supplier, according to the Healthcare Business Management Association (HBMA). RCM involves several processes from the time a patient schedules an appointment to claim submission and payment collection. Insurance verification and authorization are key processes performed in the initial phase of RCM or medical billing insurance claims process. Though both aims at preventing claim rejection and delays, insurance verification and prior authorization are distinct and different.

What is Insurance Verification?

The life cycle of a patient begins with appointment scheduling and registration where demographic and insurance information is collected. This sets the stage for insurance verification – the process of checking the patient’s health payer coverage and benefits prior to the encounter. The goal is to confirm:

  • If the patient has active insurance coverage
  • What procedures/services are and are not covered
  • How much of each procedure the insurer will cover and the patient’s financial obligation

The following information is collected when a patient calls to schedule an appointment:

  • Patient’s name and date of birth;
  • Name of the insurance provider
  • Name of the primary insurance plan holder and their relationship to the patient;
  • Patient’s policy number and group ID number (if applicable); and
  • Insurance company’s phone number and address

A reliable insurance verification service provider will make sure that all the required details about insurance eligibility and benefits are collected before the patient visit, which includes:

  • Type of plan and coverage details
  • Calendar year/ policy year
  • Effective date
  • Plan annual maximum
  • Plan deductible
  • Primary and secondary insurance
  • Per code coverage, if available
  • Copays and deductibles
  • DME coverage
  • Plan exclusions
  • Referral and pre-authorization requirements
  • Out of network benefits

Insurance verification specialists will get a full breakdown of patients’ insurance coverage and benefits by visiting payer web portals or calling the insurance carrier with the information collected from the patient during the initial phone call.

Proactive patient eligibility verification is crucial for a successful claim submission in medical billing:

  • Improves the patient experience: Verifying the patient’s insurance before the office encounter and communicating to them as to what their plan covers and doesn’t cover will ensure transparency. Patients will know about the costs of their care and can better prepare to pay their bills. With transparency throughout the medical billing process, patients will not face any costly surprises.
  • Reduces claim denials: If the patient’s information is outdated and the provider uses that to submit a claim, it would result in an instant payment denial. Verifying patient eligibility upfront will ensure that claims are submitted with current and accurate data and prompt payment. Insurance verification services minimize claim denials and saves time and money that would go into reworking claims.
  • Maximizes cash flow: Proper insurance verification will ensure that claims are submitted with up-to-date information. Clean claims will be approved faster and speed up the medical billing cycle. Reduced denials and a larger number of clean claims will increase practice cash flow.

What is Insurance Authorization?

Insurance authorization or prior authorization is a “health plan cost-control process by which physicians and other health care providers must obtain advance approval from a health plan before a specific service is delivered to the patient to qualify for payment coverage” (American Medical Association. Prior authorization is also referred to as precertification, pre-authorization, prior approval, and predetermination. Insurance companies use the prior authorization process to determine if prescribed medical treatments, drugs, or medical equipment will be covered in full or in part.

The insurance authorization process begins when a service prescribed by a patient’s physician is not covered by their health insurance plan. The physician’s office has to communicate with the insurance company and complete a prior authorization form along with documentation supporting the medical necessity of the specific procedure, test, medication, or device. Prior authorization is a time-consuming process that can delay patient access to care.

Insurance Verification vs. Insurance Authorization

The differences between insurance verification and insurance authorization are as follows:

  • Unlike insurance verification which is performed before the patient encounter, the prior authorization process begins when a procedure, test, medication or device that the physician prescribes for a patient requires preapproval from the insurer.
  • Insurance verification is related to the process of creating and filing medical claims and obtaining payment for patient services, while prior authorization is about obtaining prior authorization for services.
  • For a smooth preauthorization process, medical billing personnel needs to be knowledgeable about the CPT code for the services for which approval is requested. Insurance verification focuses on coverage status, active/inactive status and eligibility status.

Both insurance verification and authorization are time consuming processes that can lead to denials. That’s why they are best handled by experts. Outsourcing these tasks to an experienced insurance verification company can go a long way toward saving time, preventing denials and delays, optimizing reimbursement, and improving patient care and satisfaction.

What are the Different Types of Denials in Medical Billing?

What are the Different Types of Denials in Medical Billing?

Earning sufficient revenue to cover overhead expenses and provide quality care is a major challenge for healthcare practices and hospitals. In addition to numerous declining reimbursements, government regulations, and third-party requirements, medical billing denials are the main concern for sustaining a successful medical business. Denials and delayed or incorrect reimbursements from payers are the results of inefficient coding and billing. Getting professional support is a viable solution. There are different types of denials and partnering with an experienced physician billing company can help prevent them.

Change Healthcare: Most Medical Billing Denials are Preventable

Findings of the Change Healthcare 2020 Revenue Cycle Denials Index show that about 85% of denials are preventable, but nearly a quarter (24%) of these cannot be recovered. The analysis revealed worrying statistics:

  • The average denials rate is up 23% since 2016, topping 11.1% of claims denied upon initial submission through the third quarter of 2020
  • Since the onset of COVID-19, denials have risen 11% nationally.
  • The highest denial rates are in regions with the highest first-wave of COVID-19 outbreaks
  • Half of the denials are caused by front-end revenue cycle issues (Registration/Eligibility, Authorization, Service Not Covered).
  • The top denials cause remained constant since 2016: Registration/ Eligibility, approaching 27% of denials.

Common Causes of Medical Billing Denials

Claim denials come under two categories: hard and soft. A hard denial is when the insurance refuses to pay the claim because the service is not covered. Even appeals may fail to reverse or correct a hard denial, leading to lost revenue. Soft denial is when an insurance company reviews a claim and rejects payment due to an issue like missing data or lack of documentation. Soft denials are temporary and have the potential to be revered if the provider makes the necessary corrections on the claim or provides the required information. Physician billing companies are well aware of the reasons for claims denials and help practices implement proactive strategies to prevent them.

  • Missing or invalid claims information: A denial can be triggered when a claim form is incomplete. Missing or wrong data on a claim could be everything from social security numbers to plan codes, modifiers, addresses, and other demographic and technical errors. The Change Healthcare 2020 study found that missing or invalid claim data accounted for 17.2% of medical billing denials and 26.6% are caused by patient registration/eligibility issues. Insurance verification plays a key role in preventing eligibility denials in medical billing.
  • Medical coding errors: Coding issues in the bill will result in a payment denial. Errors include: missing codes, wrong codes, using the wrong coding system for the insurer, standard of care does not align with the included diagnosis codes, or undercoding and overcoding which occurs when the claim contains higher-level CPT or HCPCS codes than what is supported by medical necessity, medical facts, or the provider’s documentation.
  • Duplicate claim or service: This type of denial occurs when claims are resubmitted for a single encounter on the same date by the same health care provider for the same beneficiary for the same service. Duplicates account for up to 32% of Medicare Part B claim denials.
  • Lack of coordination of patient benefits: Some patients may have multiple payers. Claims must be submitted to the primary insurance first, and depending on the need, the balance is submitted to the patient’s secondary and tertiary insurances. Reasons why coordination of benefit denial occurs include:
    • Estimate of benefits is missing
    • Another insurance is considered primary
    • The member has not updated additional insurance information

Coordination of benefits is necessary to determine which payer is the primary, secondary, and tertiary insurance to ensure that the correct payer’s pay and duplication of payments is prevented.

  • Service not covered: This type of denial occurs due to neglecting to perform insurance verification to determine if the procedures and services being provided are covered under the patient’s current benefit plan. Service Not Covered accounts for 57.7% of claims denials, according to the Change Healthcare 2020 Revenue Cycle Denials Index.
  • Medical necessity: A top denial reason (accounting for 6% according to Change Healthcare), medical necessity denials are hard denials. The reasons for this type of denial are:
    • Inpatient criteria have not been met
    • Inappropriate use of the emergency room
    • Length of stay
    • Inappropriate level of care

Medical necessity denials need an appeal to request reconsideration

  • Service already adjudicated: This type of denial occurs when a service is already included in another claim/payment which was already settled.
  • Authorization/Pre-Certification: Payers have specific prior authorization requirements and when these are not met, claims are denied. Moreover, these rules tend to change frequently and unexpectedly and practices would have to resubmit forms for denied claims in accordance with the payer’s updated specifications.
  • Time limit for filing has expired: Insurance companies have strict time limits for claim submission, including a deadline to submit reworked claims and reviews to check codes and coverage. Inpatient medical coding errors accounted for 81% of complex claim denials in the fourth quarter of 2015, and correcting them can cause delays that go past the submission deadline (https://itechdata.ai/).

Strategies to Prevent Claim Denials

Though most medical billing denials are preventable, the problem continues unabated. Medical Economics reported on a study that identified the factors responsible for the rise in claim denials as “a lack of denials resources, such as expertise to support appeals and data for root cause analysis, as well as staff attrition and training, growing denials backlog, and legacy technology”.

Implementing a denials-prevention strategy that includes the following can help reduce the risk of claim denials:

  • Know the types of denials your practice is receiving
  • Track denials – identify the source and root cause of denials
  • Monitor clean claims ratio
  • Prioritize medical billing and coding oversight
  • Determine what remedial measures to take and where they will have the greatest impact
  • Choose end-to-end revenue cycle management software
  • Utilize advanced analytics and artificial intelligence

Last but not least, choose the right partner – a reliable physician billing service provider that will provide dedicated support to manage your revenue cycle. An expert will work with you to identify problematic trends in denials and reduce your denials by implementing best practices for medical billing, coding, and insurance verification and authorization.

BC Advantage Magazine Publishes OSI’s Article on RCM

BC Advantage Magazine Publishes OSI’s Article on RCM

Our medical billing and coding company is glad to announce that our article “Improving Accounts Receivable for Effective Revenue Cycle Management” has been published in BC Advantage Magazine’s practice management archived section. The author, Meghann Drella, CPC, is a Senior Solutions Manager at OSI.

“As a company that has been providing medical billing, coding and other support functions such as insurance verifications and authorizations for medical offices in the USA for more than 15 years, we are proud of our accomplishments. Getting featured in BC Advantage Magazine validates our company’s culture of hard work and customer service,” says Rajeev Rajagopal, President of Managed Outsource Solutions.

Monitoring accounts receivable or A/R follow-up – the outstanding amount owed by insurance companies or patients to the healthcare provider for services rendered are medical accounts receivable – has always been a hot topic in medical billing, but became a serious concern after the pandemic broke out, as it worsened RCM challenges like never before.

The November 2021 MGMA Stat poll conducted by the Medical Group Management Association received 587 applicable responses to the question “How have your days in A/R changed in 2021?” and from the responses, up to 49% of medical practice leaders reported that days in A/R increased, compared to 15% who reported a decrease and another 37% who said they remained unchanged.

OSI’s article discusses how collecting amounts that have been billed or account receivable is essential for successful Revenue Cycle Management (RCM). RCM is a complex task that involves several manuals and electronic processes, including policies and procedures to collect the amounts owed by patients and insurance companies.

The article discusses how to measure Days in AR, a key performance indicator and the reasons for an increase in A/R days and factors that can impact revenue cycle and A/R processes, challenging processes involved in RCM, and MGMA’s recommended measures to improve RCM and A/R.

BC Advantage Magazine is a highly acclaimed, CEU-approved national online healthcare publication and the largest independent resource provider in the industry for medical coders and billers, healthcare auditors, practice managers, compliance officers, and clinical documentation experts. It features articles written by industry professionals on a wide range of subjects such as billing/coding, legal issues, marketing, business building, career advantage, coders 20/20, news, reviews and more.

OSI has been successfully providing accurate medical billing, coding, and insurance verification services to the healthcare industry for well over a decade. The company’s AAPC-certified coders have a strong understanding of ICD-10-CM and CPT requirements and procedures and stay up-to-date with coding changes, payer-specific documentation requirements, and state and federal regulations. The company regularly publishes articles and blogs on practice management, medical billing and coding as well as other interesting developments in the field of medicine.

OSI provides customized revenue cycle management solutions for all medical specialities. Their experience and expertise have been continuously recognized and featured by BC Advantage Magazine.

For more information about Outsource Strategies International, please visit www.outsourcestrategies.com.

May Is Mental Health Awareness Month

May Is Mental Health Awareness Month

Each year, May is observed as National Mental Health Awareness Month, since 1949. This month aims at raising mental health awareness for everyone throughout the nation. For the 2022 Mental Health Awareness Month, NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness) promotes the message of “Together for Mental Health.” This month was commemorated by the Mental Health America organization, which was then known as the National Mental Health Association. This month is represented by a green ribbon. This observance is especially significant for psychiatrists who treat diverse mental conditions, all of which require accurate documentation in the medical records. An experienced hand in providing psychiatry medical coding services, OSI (Outsource Strategies International) supports psychiatry practices, individual psychiatrists, clinics, community mental health centers, and hospitals.

Mental health disorders refer to a wide range of mental health conditions that can affect one’s mood, thinking and behavior such as anxiety, depression, seasonal affective disorder, bipolar disorder, major depression, schizophrenia, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), among others. Mental illness affects millions of people and their families nationwide According to a report from NAMI, 21% of U.S. adults experienced mental illness in 2020 (52.9 million people). This represents 1 in 5 adults. Along with providing quality treatments, it is also important for psychiatrists to submit clean medical claims to health insurers to get their reimbursement on time.

The DSM-5 is the authoritative guide for diagnosing mental health disorders in the U.S. Let us look at the most commonly used ICD-10 codes for mental, behavioral, and neurodevelopmental disorders.

ICD-10 Code Chapters

  • F01-F09 Mental disorders due to known physiological conditions
  • F10-F19 Mental and behavioral disorders due to psychoactive substance use
  • F20-F29 Schizophrenia, schizotypal, delusional, and other non-mood psychotic disorders
  • F30-F39 Mood [affective] disorders
  • F40-F48 Anxiety, dissociative, stress-related, somatoform and other nonpsychotic mental disorders
  • F50-F59 Behavioral syndromes associated with physiological disturbances and physical factors
  • F60-F69 Disorders of adult personality and behavior
  • F70-F79 Intellectual disabilities
  • F80-F89 Pervasive and specific developmental disorders
  • F90-F98 Behavioral and emotional disorders with onset usually occurring in childhood and adolescence
  • F99-F99 Unspecified mental disorder

Some of the ICD-10-CM codes found in the DSM-5 list are – 

  • Z60.3 Acculturation difficulty
  • Z72.811 Adult antisocial behavior
  • T74.11XA Adult physical abuse by non-spouse or non-partner, Confirmed, Initial encounter
  • T74.11XD Adult physical abuse by non-spouse or non-partner, Confirmed, Subsequent encounter
  • G25.79 Other drug induced movement disorders
  • G31.9 Major neurocognitive disorder due to Parkinson’s disease, Possible
  • G47.00 Insomnia, unspecified
  • G47.37 Central sleep apnea in conditions classified elsewhere
  • R06.3 Periodic breathing
  • Z62.898 Other specified problems related to upbringing
  • Z72.810 Child and adolescent antisocial behavior
  • Z63.8 High expressed emotion level within the family
  • Z69.11 Encounter for mental health services for victim of spousal or partner abuse
  • Z69.12 Encounter for mental health services for the perpetrator of spousal or partner abuse
  • Z69.011 Encounter for mental health services for the perpetrator of parental child abuse
  • Z69.82 Encounter for mental health services for the perpetrator of other abuse
  • Z71.9 Counseling, unspecified
  • Z91.49 Other personal histories of psychological trauma, not elsewhere classified

CPT code chapters

  • 90804-90809: Insight-oriented, behavior modifying and/or supportive psychotherapy
  • 90810-90815: Interactive psychotherapy

Psychiatric Diagnostic Interview

  • Code 90801: Psychiatric diagnostic interview examination
  • Code 90802: Interactive psychiatric diagnostic interview examination

Psychotherapy CPT codes

  • 90832 Psychotherapy, 30 minutes with the patient
  • 90834 Psychotherapy, 45 minutes with the patient
  • 90837 Psychotherapy, 60 minutes with the patient
  • 90845 Psychoanalysis
  • 90846 Family psychotherapy (without the patient present), 50 minutes
  • 90847 Family psychotherapy (conjoint psychotherapy) (with patient present), 50 minutes
  • 90849 Multiple-family group psychotherapy
  • 90853 Group psychotherapy (other than of a multiple-family group)

Other codes

  • 90791 — Psychiatric diagnostic evaluation without medical services
  • 90875 – Under other psychiatric services or procedures
  • 99404 — Under preventive medicine, individual counseling services

With a growing number of Americans facing mental health issues each year, it is important for psychiatrists and other mental health specialists to file accurate claims with the right diagnosis and procedure codes. It is key to ensure that the codes on the insurance claim forms accurately reflect the services they provided to their patients.

Providers must make sure to rely on AAPC-certified coders who are up-to-date with psychiatric therapeutic and diagnostic codes, health behavior assessment and intervention codes, as well as HCPCS Level II codes. At OSI, we understand that psychiatry medical coding is quite challenging. Our billing and coding team is up-to-date with the reimbursement policies of major private and government payers so as to assign the correct payer-specific codes.

Check out
Tips To Code And Bill Mental Health Services [Infographic]

Listen to our podcast
Benefits of Insurance Verification for Behavioral and Mental Health Billing

Documenting Atherosclerosis Cardiovascular Disease with ICD-10 Code

Documenting Atherosclerosis Cardiovascular Disease with ICD-10 Code

Atherosclerosis is a serious cardiovascular condition wherein the arteries are clogged with fatty substances called plaques, or atheroma. Health practices are required to give immediate patient care as atherosclerosis leads to life-threatening problems like heart attacks or strokes. If the patient is not promptly treated, the condition can worsen. Against this backdrop, it is essential that health practices rely upon thoracic and cardiovascular surgery medical billing services to appropriately assign ICD-10 codes based on accurately prepared clinical documentation. This aids practices in the efficient management of the revenue cycle as well.

ICD-10 Codes

✥  I70: Atherosclerosis

  • I70.0: Atherosclerosis of aorta
  • I70.1: Atherosclerosis of renal artery

➣ I70.2: Atherosclerosis of native arteries of the extremities

  • I70.20: Unspecified atherosclerosis of native arteries of extremities
  • I70.21: Atherosclerosis of native arteries of extremities with intermittent claudication
  • I70.22: Atherosclerosis of native arteries of extremities with rest pain
  • I70.23: Atherosclerosis of native arteries of right leg with ulceration
  • I70.24: Atherosclerosis of native arteries of left leg with ulceration
  • I70.25: Atherosclerosis of native arteries of other extremities with ulceration
  • I70.26: Atherosclerosis of native arteries of extremities with gangrene
  • I70.29: Other atherosclerosis of native arteries of extremities

➣ I70.3: Atherosclerosis of unspecified type of bypass graft (s) of the extremities

  • I70.30: Unspecified atherosclerosis of unspecified type of bypass graft(s) of the extremities
  • I70.31: Atherosclerosis of unspecified type of bypass graft(s) of the extremities with intermittent claudication.
  • I70.32: Atherosclerosis of unspecified type of bypass graft(s) of the extremities with rest pain
  • I70.33: Atherosclerosis of unspecified type of bypass graft(s) of the right leg with ulceration
  • I70.34: Atherosclerosis of unspecified type of bypass graft (s) of the left leg with ulceration
  • I70.35: Atherosclerosis of unspecified type of bypass graft(s) of other extremity with ulceration
  • I70.36: Atherosclerosis of unspecified type of bypass graft(s) of the extremities with gangrene
  • I70.39: Other atherosclerosis of unspecified type of bypass graft(s) of the extremities

➣ I70.4: Atherosclerosis of autologous vein bypass graft (s) of the extremities

  • I70.40: Unspecified atherosclerosis of autologous vein bypass graft (s) of the extremities
  • I70.41: Atherosclerosis of autologous vein bypass graft(s) of the extremities with intermittent claudication
  • I70.42: Atherosclerosis of autologous vein bypass graft (s) of the extremities with rest pain
  • I70.43: Atherosclerosis of autologous vein bypass graft(s) of the right leg with ulceration
  • I70.44: Atherosclerosis of autologous vein bypass graft(s) of the left leg with ulceration
  • I70.45: Atherosclerosis of autologous vein bypass graft(s) of other extremity with ulceration
  • I70.46: Atherosclerosis of autologous vein bypass graft (s) of the extremities with gangrene
  • I70.49: Other atherosclerosis of autologous vein bypass graft(s) of the extremities

➣ I70.5: Atherosclerosis of nonautologous biological bypass graft(s) of the extremities

  • I70.50: Unspecified atherosclerosis of nonautologous biological bypass graft(s) of the extremities
  • I70.51: Atherosclerosis of nonautologous biological bypass graft(s) of the extremities intermittent claudication
  • I70.52: Atherosclerosis of nonautologous biological bypass graft(s) of the extremities with rest pain
  • I70.53: Atherosclerosis of nonautologous biological bypass graft(s) of the right leg with ulceration
  • I70.54: Atherosclerosis of nonautologous biological bypass graft(s) of the left leg with ulceration
  • I70.55: Atherosclerosis of nonautologous biological bypass graft(s) of other extremity with ulceration
  • I70.56: Atherosclerosis of nonautologous biological bypass graft(s) of the extremities with gangrene
  • I70.59: Other atherosclerosis of nonautologous biological bypass graft(s) of the extremities

➣ I70.6: Atherosclerosis of nonbiological bypass graft(s) of the extremities

  • I70.60: Unspecified atherosclerosis of nonbiological bypass graft(s) of the extremities
  • I70.61: Atherosclerosis of nonbiological bypass graft (s) of the extremities with intermittent
  • I70.62: Atherosclerosis of nonbiological bypass graft(s) of the extremities with rest pain
  • I70.63: Atherosclerosis of nonbiological bypass graft(s) of the right leg with ulceration
  • I70.64: Atherosclerosis of nonbiological bypass graft(s) of the left leg with ulceration
  • I70.65: Atherosclerosis of nonbiological bypass graft(s) of other extremity with ulceration
  • I70.66: Atherosclerosis of nonbiological bypass graft(s) of the extremities with gangrene
  • I70.69: Other atherosclerosis of nonbiological bypass graft(s) of the extremities

➣ I70.7: Atherosclerosis of other type of bypass graft(s) of the extremities

  • I70.70: Unspecified atherosclerosis of other type of bypass graft(s) of the extremities
  • I70.71: Atherosclerosis of other type of bypass graft(s) of the extremities with intermittent claudication
  • I70.72: Atherosclerosis of other type of bypass graft(s) of the extremities with rest pain
  • I70.73: Atherosclerosis of other type of bypass graft(s) of the right leg with ulceration
  • I70.74: Atherosclerosis of other type of bypass graft(s) of the left leg with ulceration
  • I70.75: Atherosclerosis of other type of bypass graft(s) of other extremity with ulceration
  • I70.76: Atherosclerosis of other type of bypass graft(s) of the extremities with gangrene
  • I70.79: Other atherosclerosis of other type of bypass graft(s) of the extremities

➣ I70.8: Atherosclerosis of other arteries

➣ I70.9: Other and unspecified atherosclerosis

Cardiology billing and coding experiences regular amendments of key procedure rules. Medical billing and coding services focus on ensuring accurate codes by staying up to date with new, deleted, and revised cardiology codes. This completely eliminates the chances of claim denial. In addition, the highest degree of specificity is ensured in a cost-effective manner.