What are the CDT codes to Report Bone Grafts?

What are the CDT codes to Report Bone Grafts?

Augmentation of bony defects due to loss of teeth using bone-grafting materials is a common procedure performed by general dentists, periodontists and oral surgeons. When billing bone grafts, it is necessary to use the most up-to-date codes, while avoiding unlisted, unspecified and nonspecific codes. In addition to selecting the right CDT code, dentists have to also report the correct ICD-10 code to indicate the diagnosis. Further, as medical insurance reimburses for oral surgeries, with knowledge about cross-coding, dental offices save dental insurance and help patients get needed treatment. Working with an experienced dental billing company is a practical strategy for dentists to manage the billing and coding process and maximize reimbursement.

When Bone Grafting is Necessary

Bone grafts are used in combination with endodontic, oral surgery, implants and periodontal procedures. Bone loss in the jaw due to loss of teeth can cause atrophy of remaining alveolar bone, leading to chewing and speech problems, soft-tissue pain, muscle dysfunction, and lack of bone for tooth implants. Bone grafting is usually performed in the following situations:

  • After tooth extraction to limit the amount of hard- and soft-tissue loss
  • Before dental implant surgery to replace a lost tooth
  • To build the jaw before dental implant placement
  • When bone loss affects neighboring teeth
  • For reducing bone loss caused by periodontal disease
  • To correct trauma or surgery defects
  • General alveolar deterioration

There are various types of bone grafting material options:

  • Autogenous – the tissue is taken from the patient undergoing the graft procedure
  • Non-autogenous: the graft is taken from donor other than the patient (allogenic, alloplastic, allograft and xenograft materials)

After the procedure, the bone graft will support bone healing and regeneration, and add volume and density to the jaw.

CDT Codes for Bone Grafts

The CDT codes for graft procedures are found in the Endodontics, Periodontics, Implant service and Oral & Maxillofacial surgery service categories. Dentists need to report the correct CDT code to describe the grafting procedure that the patient underwent.

The CDT codes for bone grafts are as follows

  • Bone Graft for Endo/Periradicular Defects

D3428 Bone Graft in Conjunction with Periradicular Surgery – per tooth, single site (includes non-autogenous graft material)

D3429 Bone Graft in Conjunction with Periradicular Surgery – each add’l contiguous tooth in same surgical site (includes non-autogenous graft material)

  • Bone Graft for Periodontal Defects

D4263 Bone replacement graft – retained natural tooth – first site in quadrant

D4264 Bone replacement graft – retained natural tooth – each additional site in quadrant

  • Bone Graft for Periimplant Defects

D6103 Bone Graft for Repair of Periimplant Defect

Note: This is for grafting a bone defect around an existing implant, and does not include flap entry and closure. Placement of a barrier membrane or biologic materials to aid in osseous regeneration should be reported separately.

  • Bone Graft When Placing Implant

D6104, Bone Graft at Time of Implant Placement

Note: This is for bone grafting around an implant at the same time the implant is placed. The placement of a barrier membrane, or biological materials to aid in osseous regeneration is reported separately.

  • Bone Graft for Ridge Augmentation in Edentulous Site

D7950 Osseous, Osteoperiosteal, or Cartilage Graft of the Mandible or Maxilla – Autogenous or Nonautogenous, By Report

Note: It includes obtaining autograft and/or allograft material. Placement of a barrier membrane, if used, should be reported separately. This is not a graft done in an extraction site or implant removal site.

Reporting Graft Material Acquisition

There are CDT Codes with descriptions that state that:

    • the procedure includes graft material acquisition
    • the graft material is acquired as a separate procedure and reported with the appropriate code

➤ Procedures where Material Acquisition and Graft Placement are separate

Graft Procedures Not including Obtaining Graft MaterialThe following CDT codes explicitly state that the procedure does not include harvesting or collecting the graft material:

D7950 Bone Replacement Graft for Ridge Preservation – per site

CDT descriptor: “Osseous autograft, allograft or non-osseous graft is placed in an extraction or implant removal site at the time of the extraction or removal to preserve ridge integrity (e.g., clinically indicated in preparation for implant reconstruction or where the alveolar contour is critical to planned prosthetic reconstruction).”

Note: This dental bone graft code can be used when filling in the hole after the removal of a tooth or dental implant. It does not include obtaining graft material. If a membrane is used, it should be reported separately.

D7955 Repair of Maxillofacial Soft Tissue and/or Hard Tissue Defect

Note: Reconstruction of surgical traumatic or congenital defects of the facial bones, including the mandible, may utilize graft materials in conjunction with soft tissue procedures to repair and restore the facial bones to form and function. This procedure does not include edentulous maxilla and mandibular reconstructions for prosthetic considerations

    ➤ CDT Code for Graft Material Collection Only

D7295 Harvest of Bone for Use in Autogenous Grafting Procedures

Note: D7295 is the only code entry specifically for reporting acquisition of material used in a separate graft procedure. It is reported when hard tissue (bone) is collected from the patient who is also to receive the separate bone graft procedure.

    ➤ Graft Procedures that Include Material Acquisition

Graft Procedures including Graft Material Acquisition

There are 13 CDT codes for procedures where the descriptor states that the acquisition of the graft material is included and not to be reported as a separate procedure in a claim. For e.g., the following procedures include graft material acquisition in general terms:

D4277 Free soft tissue graft procedure (including recipient and donor surgical sites) first tooth, implant or edentulous tooth position in graft

D4278 Free soft tissue graft procedure (including recipient and donor surgical sites) each additional contiguous tooth, implant or edentulous tooth position in same graft site

D7943 Osteotomy – mandibular rami with bone graft; includes obtaining the graft

D7951 Sinus augmentation with bone or bone substitutes [The augmentation of the sinus cavity to increase alveolar height for the reconstruction of edentulous portions of the maxilla. This includes obtaining bone or bone substitutes. Placement of a barrier membrane, if used, should be reported separately].

D7952 Sinus augmentation via a vertical approach

With the multiple CDT codes involved, documentation of graft procedures can be confusing. Insurance companies will reimburse bone grafts only if they are medically necessary for the success of the procedure being performed or when normal healing cannot be expected to eliminate the bony defect (www.aetna.com). Further, dental insurance verification is necessary to understand patient coverage as each benefit plan has different rules as to which services are covered, which are excluded and which have dollar caps or other limitations. Therefore, it is recommended that the practice sends out a pre-treatment authorization to ensure a smooth claim determination process. Partnering with an experienced provider of dental billing services is the best way to meet these requirements.

Dental and Medical Billing Guidelines for Frenectomies

Dental and Medical Billing Guidelines for Frenectomies

Frenectomy procedures are performed primarily on infants, and it involves the removal of one or both frena from the mouth. As per the statistics given by the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, the number of frenotomy/frenectomy procedures performed is growing with a 90 percent increase in recent years. As the ADA (American Dental Association) changes the CDT (Current Dental Terminology) codes frequently, dental practices are required to adopt the changes and ensure accuracy in their claims. A dental billing company can help with complete and accurate documentation of dental procedures.

Frenectomy – A Covered Dental Procedure;

Frenectomy is considered medical in nature due to the following two reasons:

  • There is a problem feeding the newborns
  • It is required to correct congenital malformation( Ankyloglossia)

It implies that a frenectomy is medically necessary and is accompanied by the following symptoms, according to provcomm.ibx.com:

  • Difficulty feeding/eating
  • Difficulty chewing ( mastication)
  • Difficulty swallowing
  • Speech impairment or difficulty with articulation

The procedures used to treat the lingual frenum (other than for ankyloglossia), the labial frenum and the buccal frenum are considered dental procedures. Dental practices have to take note of the fact that they are not covered under medical plans and are considered benefit contract exclusions.

CPT Codes for Frenectomy or Frenotomy

  • 41010

In this procedure, the provider makes an incision in the lingual frenum, a membranous ridge under the tongue, to allow greater movement of the tongue in patients with ankyloglossia.

  • 41115

In this procedure, the provider makes an incision at the base of the tongue and excises the frenum.;

  • 40806

The provider incises the labial frenum, the tag of tissue in the center of the upper or the lower lip that attaches the lip to the gums of the patient. The provider does not remove the frenum. The provider commonly performs this procedure to release a tight frenum and its surrounding tissues.

  • 40819

In this procedure, the provider removes the labial or buccal frenum, each of which is a membrane structure in the mouth. Labial refers to the lip and buccal refers to the cheek.

  • 41115

In this procedure, the provider makes an incision at the base of the tongue and excises the frenum.

ICD-10 Codes

  • Q38.1

Ankyloglossia

For feeding difficulties:

  • R63.3 – Feeding difficulties
  • P92.5- Neonatal difficulty in feeding at the breast
  • P92.8- Other feeding problems of newborn
  • P92.9- Feeding problem of newborn, unspecified

For childhood articulation problems:

  • F80.0- Phonological disorder
  • F80.89-Other developmental disorders of speech and language
  • F80.9- Developmental disorder of speech and language, unspecified

CDT Codes

The below-mentioned codes are newly added CDT codes and are effective from 01/01/2021.

  • D7961- Buccal / labial frenectomy (frenulectomy)
  • D7962- Lingual frenectomy ( frenulectomy)

Guidelines to Follow While Claiming Dental Insurance

  • To facilitate coverage and payment, submitting the claim with x-rays alone is insufficient.
  • The above-mentioned codes are applicable only if the procedure involves removing a patient’s frenum.
  • Carefully consider the patient’s plan limitations and exclusions.
  • The claims of this procedure are limited to once per lifetime, per tooth.
  • If connective tissue graft or pedicle graft is reported on the same visit as the frenectomy, the frenectomy is considered inclusive with no additional payments.
  • According to dentistryiq.com, a narrative should also be included which indicates the following:
    • Amount of gingival recession in millimetres
    • The severity of gingival inflammation
    • The level of sensitivity
    • Bleeding on probing
  • The claim form should be accompanied by pre-op and post-op x-rays in addition to periodontal charting.

General Guidelines for Medical Billing for Dental Surgery

According to dentalproductsreport.com, to successfully place dental claims, the following has to be accurately documented:

  • The primary presenting situation
  • Any secondary, supporting diagnosis
  • The diagnosis code for the treatment
  • Surgical pre-authorization
  • Medical necessity, in the form of a letter of medical necessity
  • Support from the patient’s primary care physician, in the form of a supporting letter of medical necessity
  • The procedures performed at each surgery location

This is vital information that is required by the medical insurance company to get a comprehensive understanding of the care provided.

  • Prior-authorization

Frenectomy procedures require a pre-authorization. The insurer has to be contacted via phone to explain the procedure and the date. Reimbursement claims will be rejected if pre-authorization is not obtained.

  • Verification of insurance

Dental eligibility verification is essential to gather information about the coverage for this surgery. The following information must be collected from the patients first:

  • Name of the primary insured
  • Social security number of the primary insured
  • Insurance carrier
  • ID number
  • Group number
  • Contact details of the insurance company like phone number, web address and residential address for submitting claims.
  • Proving medical necessity

A frenectomy is performed as a medically necessary procedure. Accurate medical coding is vital. Coding should inform the payer that the procedure was performed and the reason that the patient’s concern was medical rather than just a dental problem

  • Accurate coding

Appropriate ICD-10 codes and CPT codes have to be incorporated in the Letter of Medical Necessity. According to Dental Practice Management, dental practices have to limit themselves to entering only four diagnostic codes in the Letter of Medical Necessity. The most important procedure should be listed first, followed by the procedures of a lesser importance.

  • Documenting and submitting the claims

After the dental surgery, the next important step is filling in the claims submission form correctly. A thorough look over the forms is necessary to identify typos or missed information. The claim must be submitted to the insurer with appropriate documentation. Lab or diagnostic imaging studies are also to be submitted along with the claims as supporting documents.

Compared to billing for other medical specialities, dental billing is complex. An experienced dental billing company can help dental practices to improve dental billing collections and ROI, particularly for services like frenectomies where prior authorization is required.

Dental Billing Codes for Surgical Periodontic Procedures

Dental Billing Codes for Surgical Periodontic Procedures

Periodontal diseases need to be treated on time to prevent any infection. If non-surgical treatment options fail, dentists may recommend surgical periodontic procedures to prevent future gum damage, remove bacteria from beneath the gums, and reshape the bones that support the teeth. Periodontal surgery comprises several procedures such as gingival flap surgery, mucogingival surgery, and osseous surgery. Dental practices can report such procedures on insurance claims using specific CDT and ICD-10 codes. Consider partnering with a professional dental billing company that can provide support in submitting clean dental claims.

CDT Codes for Surgical Periodontic Procedures

Gingivectomy

Gingivectomy refers to the surgical removal of gingival or gum tissue. The procedure is mainly done to treat gingivitis and for cosmetic purposes. The surgery involves removing a portion of the gums around a tooth or teeth, which can lengthen the height or width of a tooth or a section of teeth. 

  • D4210 Gingivectomy or gingivoplasty – four or more contiguous teeth or tooth bounded spaces per quadrant
  • D4211 Gingivectomy or gingivoplasty –one to three contiguous teeth or tooth bounded spaces per quadrant
  • D4212 Gingivectomy or Gingivoplasty to allow access to restorative procedure, per tooth
  • D4240 gingival flap procedure, including root planing – four or more contiguous teeth or tooth bounded spaces per quadrant
  • D4241 gingival flap procedure, including root planing – one to three contiguous teeth or tooth bounded spaces per quadrant
  • D4346 scaling in presence of generalized moderate or severe gingival inflammation- full mouth, after oral evaluation
  • D4921 gingival irrigation- per quadrant
  • D7971 excision of per coronal gingival

Dental Crown Lengthening 

For better oral hygiene and comfort, dental crowns need to be properly fixed. A dental crown lengthening procedure helps correct excess gum tissue covering the teeth. The procedure is performed by recontouring gum tissue or bone, which exposes more of a tooth’s surface for a crown.

  • D4249 Clinical crown lengthening – hard tissue 

Osseous Surgery 

This surgery is performed to manage the destruction caused by periodontal gum disease. Subtypes of osseous surgery include the bone reshaping or resectioning procedures and bone stimulative procedures. While osteotomy can reshape bones, osteotomy can correct bone defects and create normal bone contours. 

  • D4260 Osseous surgery (including flap entry and closure) – four or more contiguous teeth or tooth bounded spaces per quadrant 
  • D4261 Osseous surgery (including flap entry and closure) – one to three contiguous teeth or tooth bounded spaces per quadrant 

Mesial/Distal Wedge

This surgical procedure is done following the extraction of a wisdom tooth.  It helps to remove the additional tissue that is covering a portion of the back teeth in the gap left by the wisdom tooth. This surgery involves numbing the area using local anaesthesia and removing a small wedge of tissue and suturing the surgical wounds with stitches.

  • D4274 Mesial/distal wedge procedure, a single tooth (when not performed in conjunction with surgical procedures in the same anatomical area) 
  • D4999 Unspecified periodontal procedure, by a report

Anatomical Crown exposure

Anatomical crown exposure is recommended for uneven gum lines and for teeth appearing too short. Here, the excess gum and tissue are removed and the gum line is then sculpted to create a correct proportion between gum tissue and tooth surface.

  • D4230 Anatomical Crown Exposure four or more contiguous teeth
  • D4231 Anatomical Crown Exposure one to three contiguous teeth
  • D4268 Surgical Revision Procedure per tooth

Regeneration

During the regeneration periodontal surgical procedure, the periodontist folds back the gum tissue to eliminate bacteria. It helps in completely restoring the lost tissues.  Even after the procedure, there are chances for epithelial, gingival connective tissue or bone to grow along the root surface.

  • D4265 Biologic materials to aid in soft and osseous tissue regeneration

Soft Tissue Grafting

A gum graft is recommended to protect the teeth from the damaging effects of gum recession or to improve the appearance of the smile. Three different types of gum tissue grafts are connective-tissue grafts, free gingival grafts, and Pedicle grafts.

  • D4270 Pedicle soft tissue graft procedure

Related ICD-10 codes

  • C03 Malignant neoplasm of gum
  • C03.0 Malignant neoplasm of upper gum
  • C03.1 Malignant neoplasm of lower gum
  • C03.9 Malignant neoplasm of gum, unspecified
  • D00.00 Carcinoma in situ of the oral cavity, unspecified site
  • D10.39 Benign neoplasm of other parts of the mouth
  • K05 Gingivitis and periodontal diseases
  • K05.0 Acute gingivitis
  • K05.1 Chronic gingivitis
  • K05.2 Aggressive periodontitis
  • K05.3 Chronic periodontitis
  • K05.4 Periodontosis
  • K05.5 Other periodontal diseases
  • K05.6 Periodontal disease, unspecified
  • K06 Other disorders of gingiva and edentulous alveolar ridge
  • K06.0 Gingival recession
  • K06.1 Gingival enlargement
  • K06.2 Gingival and edentulous alveolar ridge lesions associated with trauma
  • K06.3 Horizontal alveolar bone loss
  • K06.8 Other specified disorders of gingiva and edentulous alveolar ridge
  • K06.9 Disorder of gingiva and edentulous alveolar ridge, unspecified

Choosing the right dental or diagnosis codes for these periodontal surgeries require good knowledge of the changing coding and billing standards. Professional dental billing companies can take care of the time-consuming dental insurance eligibility verification tasks, and thus ensure the smooth flow of revenue for the services provided.

Also Read:
What are the Dental Codes for Gingivectomy?
Documenting and Coding Periodontitis – Know the ICD-10 Codes
Bundling And Down coding Issues in Dental Billing and How to Address Them
ICD-10 and CDT Dental Codes and Their Eligibility Verification
Using Dental Insurance Verification Software – Be Aware of the Pitfalls

Using Dental Insurance Verification Software – Be Aware of the Pitfalls

If your dental practice accepts insurance, implementing a streamlined dental insurance verification process is one of the most important steps to ensure a smooth patient experience and getting paid for services rendered. In fact, insurance verification is the first step in the patient intake and dental billing process.

Insurance verification involves verifying information related to the patient’s insurance eligibility and benefits. Checking the patient’s active coverage and determining their responsibility is crucial to file accurate claims and avoid denials due to patient ineligibility.  With multiple insurance plans and fee schedules, staying up to date with patient benefits can be a major hassle. There are two ways to go about it:

  • Have a dedicated dental insurance verification specialist do it manually
  • Use automated dental insurance software

Digitizing dental eligibility verification using software is widely touted for benefits such as availability of up-to-the-minute real time information, reduced delays, prevention of errors, and more. But how reliable is the process? Our research found that verifying insurance verification through a software program is not the best approach. Let’s first see how the automated option works:

A dental insurance verification platform integrates with the practice management system and digitizes the entire process. Typical features include:

  • Accesses the daily patient schedule several days in advance of the appointment
  • Automatically pre-populates patient information from the dental management system
  • Allows patients to complete their insurance forms and other paperwork from any location before their appointment
  • Digitally processes patient eligibility and payment and insurance information immediately with just a few clicks of a button
  • Reduces time patients spend in the waiting room
  • Completes all verifications for the day in a matter of seconds
  • Integrates with many commercial and government insurance payers

However, experience shows that using insurance verification software can lead to inaccuracies and inefficiencies.  Here are some major concerns voiced by dental offices using these platforms:

  • Software verifications typically only provide about 70% of the information you need. The office staff has to find the rest on their own.
  • Only limited information may be available depending on which insurance company you are checking with. Some systems provide more data than others and don’t attempt different ways to obtain more information.
  • Automated platforms do not customize their forms. They offer standard forms that are only checked within their format and guidelines.  If the provider needs to check extra codes, they must do this on their own.
  • They only provide a PDF with the benefit information retrieved. Automated systems do not update the coverage tables in the provider’s software.
  • They do not always provide accurate information on stipulations with certain procedures and waiting periods. The office staff has to rely on manual phones to find this information.
  • Eligibility information is not detailed and does not provide the requisites when it comes to periodontics or prosthetics work.

With all these limitations, it’s clear that an automated insurance verification system cannot provide all the details the dental office requires to bill patients.

Manually filling out the in-office insurance verification form is the most comprehensive way to check each patient’s status of coverage, benefits, deductibles, annual benefits limitations, maximums, co-insurance, preauthorizations, and more. Dental insurance is complex and most patients do not understand its coverage and benefits. Outsourcing dental verification to an experienced dental billing company can ensure that your office has a dedicated dental expert working is on verifications and authorizations to provide a full breakdown of individual insurance benefits – which dental procedures are covered benefits, percentage coverage for each procedure, if any benefits were already used elsewhere, what is the patient’s plan maximum, and more. Details verified before services are provided to each patient include, but are not limited to:

  • Annual maximum, including premiums, co-pays, and deductibles
  • Out-of-pocket limit (if any)
  • Limitations on pre-existing conditions
  • Coverage for braces
  • Routine and major dental treatment covered
  • Whether the plan covers diagnostic, preventive, and emergency treatment and how much
  • Who is eligible for coverage under the plan
  • Primary and secondary insurance
  • When coverage goes into effect
  • Preauthorizations

In addition to accessing the insurance company’s website to obtain the required information, and insurance verification specialist will make calls to the company to seek clarifications, provide financial counselling assistance to patients before their restorative procedures, and also help with payroll and billing. Overall, outsourcing insurance verification and authorization streamlines the process, saves your staff’s time, ensures accurate information for claims filing, and prevents denials due to eligibility errors.

Bottom line: dental insurance verification is something humans can definitely do better than software.

CDT Codes to Report Dental Implant Services

CDT Codes to Report Dental Implant Services

It is necessary to document each component of dental implant services to ensure the highest possible reimbursement. In addition, accurate documentation is also vital from the point of view of ongoing patient care. Implant procedures that meet the threshold of medical necessity are eligible for medical billing. A reputable dental billing company can appropriately code CDT codes during claims submission, based on the insurance availed. 

CDT Codes That Represent Dental Implant Services

  • D6190 

Radiographic/surgical implant index, by the report

  • D6191

Semi-precision abutment –placement

  • D6192

Semi-precision attachment-placement

Surgical Implant Procedure Codes

  • D6010 

Surgical placement of implant body: endosteal implant

  • D6011

Second stage implant surgery

  • D6012

Surgical placement of interim implant body for transitional prosthesis: endosteal implant

  • D6013

Surgical placement of mini implant

  • D6040

Surgical placement: eposteal implant

  • D6050

Surgical placement: transosteal implant

  • D6100

Implant removal, by report

  • D6101

Debridement of a peri-implant defect or defects surrounding a single implant, and surface cleaning of the exposed implant surfaces, including flap entry and closure 

  • D6102

Debridement of the osseous contouring of a peri-implant defect or defects surrounding a single implant and includes surface cleaning of the exposed implant surfaces including flap entry and closure

  • D6103

Bone graft for repair of peri-implant defect does not include flap entry and closure

  • D6104

Bone graft at the time of implant placement 

Implant Supported Prosthetics

  • D6055

Connecting bar-implant supported or abutment supported 

  • D6056

Prefabricated abutment-includes modification and placement 

  • D6057

Custom fabricated abutment-includes placement

  • D6051

Interim abutment

  • D6052

Semi- precision attachment abutment

Implant/ Abutment Supported Removable Dentures

  • D6110

Implant/ abutment supported removable denture for edentulous arch-maxillary

  • D6111

Implant/ abutment supported removable denture for edentulous arch-mandibular

Implant/Abutment Supported Fixed Dentures (Hybrid Prosthesis)

  • D6112

Implant/abutment supported removable denture for partially edentulous arch-maxillary

  • D6113

Implant/abutment supported removable denture for partially edentulous arch-mandibular

  • D6114

Implant /abutment supported fixed denture for edentulous arch-maxillary

  • D6115

Implant/abutment supported fixed denture for edentulous arch-mandibular 

  • D6116

Implant / abutment supported fixed denture for partially edentulous arch-maxillary 

  • D6117

Implant/abutment supported fixed denture for partially edentulous arch-mandibular 

  • D6118

Implant/abutment supported interim fixed denture for edentulous arch-mandibular 

  • D6119

Implant/abutment supported interim fixed denture for edentulous arch-maxillary 

Single Crowns, Abutment Supported 

  • D6058

Abutment supported porcelain/ceramic crown 

  • D6059

Abutment supported porcelain fused to metal crown (high noble metal)

  • D6060

Abutment supported porcelain fused to metal crown (predominantly base metal)

  • D6061

Abutment supported porcelain fused to metal crown (noble metal)

  • D6097

Abutment supported crown-porcelain fused to titanium or titanium alloys

  • D6062

Abutment supported cast metal crown (high noble metal)

  • D6063

Abutment supported cast metal crown (predominantly base metal)

  • D6064

Abutment supported cast metal crown (noble metal)

  • D6094

Abutment supported crown titanium and titanium alloys

Single Crowns, Implant Supported 

  • D6065

Implant supported porcelain/ceramic crown

  • D6066

Implant supported crown-porcelain fused to high noble alloys

  • D6082

Implant supported crown-porcelain fused to predominantly base alloys 

  • D6083

Implant supported crown-porcelain fused to noble alloys

  • D6084

Implant supported crown-porcelain fused to titanium or titanium alloys

  • D6067

Implant supported crown-high noble alloys

  • D6086

Implant supported crown-predominantly base alloys

  • D6087

Implant supported crown-noble alloys

  • D6088

Implant supported crown-titanium and titanium alloys

Fixed Partial Denture (FPD) Retainer, Abutment Supported

  • D6068

Abutment supported retainer for porcelain / ceramic FPD

  • D6069

Abutment supported retainer for porcelain fused to metal FPD (high noble metal)

  • D6070

Abutment supported retainer for porcelain fused to metal FPD (predominantly base metal)

  • D6071

Abutment supported retainer for porcelain fused to metal FPD (noble metal)

  • D6195

Abutment supported retainer-porcelain fused to titanium and titanium alloys 

  • D6072

Abutment supported retainer for cast metal FPD (high noble metal)

  • D6073

Abutment supported retainer for cast metal FPD (predominantly base metal)

  • D6074

Abutment supported retainer for cast metal FPD (noble metal)

  • D6194

Abutment supported retainer crown for FPD-titanium and titanium alloys

Fixed Partial Denture (FPD) Retainer, Implant Supported 

  • D6075

Implant supported retainer for ceramic FPD 

  • D6076

Implant supported retainer for FPD-porcelain fused to high noble alloys

  • D6098

Implant supported retainer-porcelain fused to predominantly base alloys

  • D6099

Implant supported retainer for FPD-porcelain fused to noble alloys 

  • D6120

Implant supported retainer-porcelain fused to titanium and titanium alloys

  • D6077

Implant supported retainer for metal FPD-high noble alloys

  • D6121

Implant supported retainer for metal FPD-predominantly base alloys 

  • D6122

Implant supported retainer for metal FPD-noble alloys

  • D6123

Implant supported retainer for metal FPD-titanium and titanium alloys 

Other Implant Services

  • D6080

Implant maintenance procedures when prostheses are removed and reinserted, including cleansing of prostheses and abutments 

  • D6081

Scaling and debridement in the presence of inflammation or mucositis of a single implant, including cleaning of the implant services, without flap entry and closure 

  • D6085

Provisional implant crown

  • D6090

Repair implant supported prosthesis, by report 

  • D6091

Replacement of semi-precision or precision attachment (male of female component) or implant /abutment supported prosthesis, per attachment 

  • D6092

Re-cement or re-bond implant/abutment supported crown

  • D6093

Re-cement or re-bond implant/abutment supported fixed partial denture

  • D6095

Repair implant abutment, by report

  • D6096

Remove broken implant retaining screw

  • D6199

Unspecified implant procedure, by report

Dental practices must keep up to date with the CDT codes and their changes in order to file the claims correctly. To maintain consistent revenue flow, save time, and deliver excellent patient care, dentists and dental practices should consider utilizing outsourced dental billing services