Ophthalmology Medical Billing For Digital Eye Strain

Ophthalmology Medical Billing For Digital Eye Strain

Digital eye strain or computer vision syndrome is caused due to the prolonged use of computers, mobile phones and such digital devices. This is a worrying health condition and if it is left untreated, the symptoms will exacerbate. The symptoms can be broadly classified into two categories:

  1. Binocular Vision Dysfunction
  2. External symptoms associated with dry eye

Primary importance is to be given for coding accuracy on the medical claims healthcare providers submit to insurers. Ophthalmology medical billing service providers can help providers ensure hassle-free revenue cycle management. Reducing the number of claim denials and timely reimbursement are given utmost priority by a medical billing and coding company. This is the reason why medical practices, ophthalmologists and physicians utilize reliable billing and medical coding services.

Outsource Strategies International has a dedicated team of well-informed, trained professionals who are adept at assigning appropriate codes, billing and following up on reimbursement claims sought from insurance companies by the health care providers. The staffs are well-versed in accurately entering the required CPT and ICD-10 codes. The patient details and dates of service should be error-free. A close scrutiny of the data at multiple levels is inevitable.

Ophthalmic diseases associated with Digital Eye Strain are Strabismus, visual disturbance, and blindness to cite a few. Assigning the corresponding codes and modifiers is a great challenge but medical coding services make the task easier.

Diagnosis

Diagnosing the underlying cause of poor vision is a very important step in managing the condition. Digital eye strain is caused as a result of the combination of many factors.

A complete eye examination of the patient with specific focus on medical history is carried out by the ophthalmologists to have an accurate diagnosis. Post medical examination, the patient may be directed to undergo dilation of the pupils. Some patients may require follow-up tests and blood tests to have a better analysis of the health conditions.

A medical billing and coding company can help medical practitioners focus on the effective treatment strategies for their patients without getting worried about sprucing up the claims for reimbursement. The proficient billers and coders ensure that the client is adequately compensated by accurately preparing the claim and including all the appropriate medical codes.

Relevant ICD-10 Codes for Digital Eye Strain

The ICD-10 code assigned to Diseases of the Eye and Adnexa is H00-H59.

  1. H49-H52: Disorders of ocular muscles, binocular movement, accommodation and refraction.
    • H49: Paralytic strabismus
    • H50: Other Strabismus
    • H51: Other disorders of binocular movement.
    • H52: Disorders of refraction and accommodation.
  2. H53-H54: Visual disturbances and blindness.
    • H53: Visual disturbances
    • H54: Blindness and low vision

CPT Codes Associated with Digital Eye Strain

The CPT code range for Ophthalmologic Services and Procedures is 92002 to 92499. The relevant codes to report Digital Eye Strain are:

  1. 92002-92014 : General Ophthalmological Services and Procedures
    • 92002-92004: New Patient General Ophthalmological Services and Procedures.
    • 92012-92014: Established Patient General Ophthalmological Services and Procedures.
  2. 92015-92287: Special Ophthalmological Services and Procedures.
    • 92015-92145: Ophthalmological Examination and Evaluation Procedures.
    • 92201-92260: Ophthalmoscopy Procedures
    • 92265-92287: Other Specialized Ophthalmological Services and Procedures.
  3. 92340-92371: Spectacle Services
    • 92341: Describes the eyeglasses of bi-focal type.
    • 92342: Fits eyeglasses that are multi-focal rather than bi-focal.
    • 92354: The provider fits magnifying lens on the eyeglasses to improve a patient’s near vision for tasks like reading.
    • 92355: The provider fits a telescopic lens on the eyeglasses for tasks that require better near vision.
  4. 92499-92499: Other Ophthalmological Services or Procedures.
    • 92499: Used to report Ophthalmological Procedures that do not have a specific code.

Choosing the Right Code – Whether E/M Code or Eye Code

Ophthalmologists are required to aptly choose between E/M Code and Eye Code. The primary goal of a billing and coding company is to aid providers in accurately specifying the correct code.

It depends on the following factors:

  • Presence of a medical element during patient visit.If the patient visit is purely for visual examination it doesn’t possess a medical element and Eye Code should be chosen.
  • The patient historyThe number of patient visits has to be analyzed because there is reimbursement limit for Eye Codes based on the frequency of the visits. E/M Code has no such restriction.
  • Evaluation of diagnosis codesEye Codes are applicable only if the diagnosis requires medical necessity. However, E/M code has no such restriction.
  • Documentation of the payerThe documentation of the payer has to be verified because E/M Codes are standardized for all payers. But there can be variations in documentation required for Eye Code.
  • Remunerative attributesChoose code that gives high reimbursement.

Why Should a Medical Practitioner Utilize Medical Coding Services?

Medical Billing and Coding Companies are adept at handling the entire billing spectrum from assigning appropriate codes to following up with the insurance companies for timely reimbursement of the claims. By outsourcing, the health care providers can focus on the better care of their patients and concentrate on strategic advantages required for their business.

Other benefits include:

  • Error-free documentation of the patient details.
  • The ICD-10 codes are frequently revised and keeping up with the changes will not be a daunting task, if a medical billing and coding company is hired.
  • Helps to cut back on claim denials.
  • Increased revenue as there is no need of additional staffs and coding specialists.
  • Aids in financial optimization by avoiding the operational costs.
  • Makes the client company compliant with the regulations put forth by the government.
  • Eliminates over coding and under coding as it can earn the wrath of auditors.
  • Efficient management of reimbursement of the claims by working round the clock.
  • Tirelessly work to expedite the claim of critical applications.
  • The services extended will be aligned with the client’s business requirements.

How Crucial Is Ophthalmology Medical Billing Service?

Nowadays, the number of patients dealing with Digital Eye Strain is increasing. Prevention of this condition is the only solution but the role of digital devices in this era is inevitable. So, we promise health care providers the ample time they require to provide better care for their patients.

Also, eye care providers are struggling to maintain a balance between limiting overhead expenses and providing the best treatment for their patients. We are duty-bound to ensure the smooth functioning of the client’s health care organization.

Coding for Pediatric or Children’s Vision Problems – A Detailed Overview

Coding for Pediatric or Children’s Vision Problems – A Detailed Overview

Eye injuries are considered the leading cause of vision loss in children. As per reports, about 42,000 sports-related eye injuries occur every year in the United States, and children suffer most of these injuries. It is estimated that one in four children experience serious vision problems and if left untreated, these problems can significantly affect the child’s learning ability, self-esteem and social skills in schools. Performing regular and comprehensive eye examinations help in identifying any vision-related problems in its early stages so that appropriate treatment can be initiated to slow or prevent the progression of any eye problems in the long run. Ophthalmology medical billing and coding can be challenging. Ophthalmologists treating different types of eye injuries or related vision problems need to ensure that the medical billing and coding for the same is done appropriately on their medical claims. To code the diagnosis and treatments correctly, they can rely on reputable medical coding companies.

Some of the most common eye conditions that children experience include – color blindness, refractive errors (nearsightedness, farsightedness, and astigmatism), amblyopia (lazy eye), strabismus (crossed eyes) and Ptosis (drooping of the eyelid).

Guidelines for Comprehensive Pediatric Eye and Vision Examinations

The American Academy of Ophthalmology and the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus recommend the following schedule for comprehensive child vision screenings –

  • Newborn – An ophthalmologist should do a comprehensive exam if the baby is – born prematurely, has signs of eye disease or a family history of childhood eye disease. New born vision screenings may include testing for identifying –
    • A “red reflex” – like seeing red eyes in a flash photograph. If the bright light shone in each eye does not return a red reflex, more testing may be needed.
    • Blink and pupil response
  • 6 to 12 Months– A second screening should be done during the child’s first year of life – usually done at a well-child exam between 6 and 12 months. The child’s pediatrician or other health care professional should visually inspect the eyes and check for healthy eye alignment and movement.
  • 12 to 36 Months – Between 12 and 36 months, a child is checked for healthy eye development. There may be a “photo screening” test – wherein a special camera captures images of the child’s eyes. These images help find problems that can lead to amblyopia (lazy eye). If any problem is detected, the child may be referred to an ophthalmologist.
  • 3 to 5 Years – Between 3 and 5 years, a child’s vision and eye alignment should be checked. This may be done by a pediatrician, family doctor, ophthalmologist or an optometrist. Visual acuity should be tested as soon as the child is old enough to read an eye chart. If the screening shows signs of – misaligned eyes (strabismus), “lazy eye” (amblyopia), refractive errors (myopia, hyperopia, astigmatism) or another focusing problem – the child will be referred to an ophthalmologist.
  • 5 Years and Older – At 5 years, children should be screened for visual acuity and alignment. Nearsightedness (myopia) is the most common problem in this age group which can be corrected with eyeglasses.

Pediatric Vision Screening Codes

When documenting pediatric or child vision conditions, it is important to include the exact causes, symptoms, diagnosis, screening tests and treatment procedures performed using the correct medical codes. Medical coding outsourcing services provided by a reputable billing company can help physicians use the correct codes for their billing purposes –

  • Z01 Encounter for other special examination without complaint, suspected or reported diagnosis
  • Z01.0 Encounter for examination of eyes and vision
    • Z01.00 …… without abnormal findings
    • Z01.01 …… with abnormal findings
    • Z01.02 Encounter for examination of eyes and vision following failed vision screening
      • Z01.020 …… without abnormal findings
      • Z01.021 …… with abnormal findings

The above codes are reported for routine examination of eyes and vision only and not reported when a vision screen is done during a routine well-child exam.

CPT Codes for Vision Screening

  • 99173 – Screening test for visual acuity, quantitative, bilateral
  • 99174 – Instrument-based ocular screening (e.g., photoscreening, automatic refraction), bilateral, with remote analysis and report
  • 99177 – With onsite analysis

August Is Observed as Children’s Eye Health and Safety Month

The month of August is observed as “Children’s Eye Health and Safety Month” in the United States. Sponsored by the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO), the month-long campaign aims to generate widespread awareness among the general public of the need to save children’s eyesight, and to prevent eye injuries and vision loss. The eye health needs of children are quite different from those of adults. Therefore, early diagnosis and treatment is critical to preserve a child’s eye health. The 2021 campaign is a timely reminder to prepare children for the classroom and athletics and make them wear the required protective gear for their classes and athletic activities, too. It encourages parents to take their children for an eye examination as part of their back to school check list.

Observing Cataract Awareness Month in June

Observing Cataract Awareness Month in June

Cataract is the world’s leading cause of blindness, accounting for approximately 42 percent of all cases of blindness in all nations. According to the report “Future of Vision – Forecasting the Prevalence and Costs of Vision Problems”, more than 25 million Americans are estimated to have cataract. As the population in the US continues to age, the number of cataract cases is projected to increase by 50 percent to 38.5 million by 2032. With an objective to generate widespread information about cataracts, the month of June is observed as “Cataract Awareness Month” in the United States. Sponsored by Prevent Blindness, the campaign aims to educate the public on cataract – its symptoms, types and treatment options. In simple terms, a cataract is a dense, cloudy area that forms in the lens of the eye. The condition begins when proteins in the eyes form clumps that prevent the lens from sending clear images to the retina. If left untreated, cataracts can interfere with daily activities and lead to blindness. Surgery to remove the clouded lens is the most recommended treatment for this condition. For correct clinical documentation of this eye condition, ophthalmologists can utilize the services of professional medical billing and coding companies.

The 2021 campaign aims to provide clear answers to some of the common misconceptions and myths about cataracts. It aims to educate people more about the causes and treatment of cataracts. In most cases, cataracts develop when aging or injury changes the tissue that makes up the lens of the eyes. Other related causes include – inherited genetic disorders, past eye surgery, long-term use of steroid medications, excessive exposure to sunlight and prevalence of certain medical conditions like diabetes. The condition develops slowly and eventually interferes with a person’s vision – forming cataracts in both eyes (but not at the same time). The condition is more common in older people, with estimates suggesting that over half of the people in the United States have cataracts or have undergone cataract surgery by the time they are 80 years old.

Generally, cataracts are of different types and are classified based on where and how they develop in a person’s eyes. Some of the common types include – nuclear cataracts, traumatic cataracts, congenital cataracts, cortical cataracts, secondary cataracts, posterior capsular cataracts, and radiation cataracts. In the initial stages, the cloudiness in the vision caused by this condition may affect only a small part of the eye’s lens and people may be quite unaware about any kind of vision loss. However, as the condition progresses, it clouds more of the lens and distorts the light passing through the lens, resulting in more noticeable symptoms. Some of the common symptoms associated with the condition include – clouded, blurred or dim vision, sensitivity to light and glare, seeing “halos” around lights, increasing difficulty with vision at night, frequent changes in eyeglass or contact lens prescription, fading or yellowing of colors and double vision in a single eye.

To correctly determine whether a person has cataract, ophthalmologists would conduct a detailed eye examination, review of previous medical history, and symptoms. Several tests like – visual acuity test, slit-lamp examination and retinal exam will be performed. In cases where prescription glasses can’t clear a person’s vision problem, the only effective treatment is surgery. In most cases, ophthalmologists recommend cataract surgery when the condition begins to affect a person’s quality of life or interfere with their ability to perform normal daily activities, such as reading or driving at night. Surgery involves removing the clouded lens and replacing it with a clear artificial lens – called an intraocular lens – which is positioned in the same place as the natural lens and remains as a permanent part of the eye. For some people, certain other eye problems may prevent the use of an artificial lens. In such cases, once the cataract is removed, vision may be corrected with eyeglasses or contact lenses.

Ophthalmology medical billing and coding can be challenging. The diagnosis tests and treatment procedures performed must be clearly documented using the correct medical codes. Medical billing and coding companies can assist physicians with their medical coding and claims submission. In ICD-10-CM, codes for cataract come under the category – H25 – H28. Under each specific cataract type, there are several sub-category codes.

  • H25 Age-related cataract
  • H25.0 Age-related incipient cataract
  • H25.1 Age-related nuclear cataract
  • H25.2 Age-related cataract, morgagnian type
  • H25.8 Other age-related cataract
  • H25.9 Unspecified age-related cataract
  • H26 Other cataract
  • H26.0 Infantile and juvenile cataract
  • H26.1 Traumatic cataract
  • H26.2 Complicated cataract
  • H26.3 Drug-induced cataract
  • H26.4 Secondary cataract
  • H26.8 Other specified cataract
  • H26.9 Unspecified cataract
  • H27 Other disorders of lens
  • H27.0 Aphakia
  • H27.1 Dislocation of lens
  • H27.8 Other specified disorders of lens
  • H27.9 Unspecified disorder of lens
  • H28 Cataract in diseases classified elsewhere

As mentioned above, the primary focus of this month-long initiative by Prevent Blindness is on generating widespread awareness about cataract. No studies have proved how to prevent or reduce the occurrence of cataracts. However, eye specialists may advise several strategies like – performing regular eye examinations, keeping medical conditions like diabetes under control, protecting the eyes from UVB rays (by wearing sunglasses outside), eating fruits and vegetables that contain antioxidants, maintaining a healthy weight, quitting the habit of smoking, and reducing the intake of alcohol.

The month of June was first designated as “Cataract Awareness Month” by the organization Prevent Blindness. Established in 1908, the organization is a trailblazer in the eye-care industry that went on to organize and get many legislations approved that would aid in preventing eye diseases in infants and age-related vision problems in adults. Over the years, the scope of the campaign widened and touched the lives of millions of people. As part of the month-long initiative, several programs like talk shows, charity runs, and poster exhibitions related to cataracts are arranged all over the US. In addition, people can also participate in the campaign by making donations to eye organizations, conducting certified vision screening and training, community and patient service programs and research – to encourage people to self educate themselves on cataract and its treatment and prevention measures.

Observing National Glaucoma Awareness Month in January 2021

Observing National Glaucoma Awareness Month in January 2021

With an objective to spread the word about a sight-stealing disease, the month of January is observed as “National Glaucoma Awareness Month” in the United States. One of the leading causes of irreversible blindness, glaucoma is an eye disease that causes damage to the optic nerve that supplies visual information to the brain from the eyes. Sponsored by the Glaucoma Research Foundation, the campaign is the perfect occasion to raise awareness of glaucoma, promote the need for a cure, and support those suffering with the emotional, financial and physical burden associated with the disease. It is a unique platform to advise the general public that the best defense against developing glaucoma-related blindness is having routine, comprehensive eye exams. There are different types of glaucoma and these types have no specific warning symptoms in the early stages. Loss of vision progresses at such a gradual rate that people affected by the disease are often quite unaware about it until a reduction in their eyesight occurs or the disease reaches an advanced stage. There is no cure for glaucoma as the vision loss associated with the condition cannot be recovered. However, medications or surgery can reduce or prevent further vision loss after diagnosis. Undergoing regular eye examinations that determine the eye pressure is helpful in identifying the condition at an early stage so that appropriate treatment can be administered to reduce or prevent the progression of the condition on a long-term basis. The treatment depends upon the type of glaucoma the person has. Ophthalmologists administering treatment modalities for different forms of glaucoma need to ensure that the billing and coding for this condition is done correctly on their medical claims. Medical billing services offered by a reputable medical billing company can ensure timely claim filing and correct reimbursement.

As per reports from the Glaucoma Research Foundation, currently more than 3 million people in the United States have glaucoma. Though glaucoma can affect people of all age groups, although the most common forms primarily affect the middle-aged and elderly people. People above the age group of 60 years are at increased risk of glaucoma and the risk of glaucoma increases slightly with each year of age. The disease tends to affect both eyes, although one may be more severely affected than the other. Gradual reduction in vision is one of the most common and initial symptoms of this condition. Other symptoms include – severe eye pain, seeing colored rings around lights, redness in your eye, nausea and vomiting and sudden blurred vision.

Diagnosis of glaucoma begins with a comprehensive eye examination wherein the ophthalmologist checks for signs of deterioration, including loss of nerve tissue. A detailed medical history evaluation is done to check for the specific symptoms the patient is experiencing and analyze whether he/she has any personal or family history of glaucoma. A general health assessment will also be done to determine if any other health conditions like diabetes or high blood pressure are affecting the eye health. Other additional tests include – tonometry (measuring intraocular pressure), visual field test (checking for areas of vision loss), pachymetry (measuring corneal thickness), gonioscopy (inspecting the drainage angle) and testing for optic nerve damage with a dilated eye examination. The basic objective of glaucoma treatment is to reduce IOP to stop any additional eyesight loss. In most cases, treatment begins with prescription eye drops. However, if these don’t give the expected results, surgery will be adviced to make a drainage path for fluid or destroy tissues that are responsible for the increased fluid. Common surgical options include – laser therapy, drainage tubes, filtering surgery and minimally invasive glaucoma surgery (MIGS). Ophthalmology medical billing and coding can be challenging. Eye specialists who happen to diagnose, screen and treat glaucoma condition need to use the correct medical codes for accurate documentation. Billing and coding services offered by experienced medical billing and coding companies ensure this so that accurate claim submissions are done. ICD-10 codes for glaucoma diagnosis include –

  • H40 Glaucoma
  • H40.0 – Glaucoma suspect
  • H40.1 – Open-angle glaucoma
  • H40.2 – Primary angle-closure glaucoma
  • H40.3 – Glaucoma secondary to eye trauma
  • H40.4 – Glaucoma secondary to eye inflammation
  • H40.5 – Glaucoma secondary to other eye disorders
  • H40.6 – Glaucoma secondary to drugs
  • H40.8 – Other glaucoma
  • H40.9 – Unspecified glaucoma
  • H42 – Glaucoma in diseases classified elsewhere

As part of the campaign, a wide range of events will be hosted across the US to spread word about this eye disease and promote awareness about the importance of eye health all year long. Healthcare centers, hospitals and local community health systems get involved in a wide range of programs like seminars, discussions, and presentations relating to this eye condition. These programs include – connecting on social media platforms for regular updates on glaucoma research and treatments, reaching out to other eye health organizations, involving in local community groups through group discussions, planning webinars and discussing about the symptoms of glaucoma with friends and family.

Join Glaucoma Awareness Month Campaign this January. Spread the word about glaucoma condition and put eye health in the national spotlight.

Coding Macular Degeneration – A Common Age-related Eye Condition

Coding Macular Degeneration – A Common Age-related Eye Condition

An eye problem can occur at any time. Some eye problems occur with age, while others may be linked to other serious conditions. In most cases, people ignore the early signs of vision problems, hoping that their eyesight will improve on its own. Macular Degeneration is an eye disease that primarily affects the retina and destroys your sharp, central vision. Also called age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the condition is caused by the deterioration of the small central portion of the retina – called macula (the inside back layer of the eye). The macula records the images we see and sends them via the optic nerve from the eye to the brain. It controls our ability to read and view objects in fine details. When the cells of the macula deteriorate, images are not received correctly. In the early stages, macular degeneration does not affect vision. However, if the disease progresses to an advanced stage, people may experience blurred vision and if the condition worsens or reaches its final stages, central vision may be completely lost. Ophthalmologists who provide treatments to patients need to know the various types of macular degeneration. To code the diagnosis and treatments correctly, they can rely on reputable medical coding companies.

Macular degeneration is a leading, common cause of severe, permanent vision loss in people above 60 years or older. According to reports from the American Macular Degeneration Foundation (AMDF), the condition affects about 10 million people in the United States – more than cataracts and glaucoma combined. AMD usually occurs in both eyes, but the degree of involvement can vary between the two eyes. Adopting a healthy lifestyle and conducting regular comprehensive eye exams by an eye health professional can help detect AMD before the disease causes vision loss. Treatment modalities can slow down vision loss, but does not restore vision.

Types and Stages of AMD

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is of two different types –

  • Dry AMD – Regarded as a common type, dry AMD occurs when parts of the macula get thinner with age and tiny yellow deposits of protein (called drusen) grow in the macula. It is estimated that about 80 percent (8 out of 10) of people who suffer AMD have the dry form. In this type, you may have blind spots in the center of your vision and as that get worse, you may lose central vision.
  • Wet AMD – Regarded as a less common but more serious type, wet AMD occurs when new abnormal vessels grow under the retina. These blood vessels leak blood and fluid into your retina resulting in distorted vision. Bleeding from the blood vessels eventually forms a scar, leading to permanent loss of central vision.

Stages of AMD

There are three stages of Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) –

  • Early AMD – In this early stage, people do not experience any kind of vision loss. That is why it is important to perform regular eye exams.
  • Intermediate AMD – In this stage, there may be some amount of vision loss, without any specific noticeable symptoms. A comprehensive eye exam at this stage can help identify drusen or pigment changes in the retina.
  • Late AMD – At this stage, complete vision loss may be noticeable.

In most cases, people realize that they have AMD only when their vision becomes very blurry. That is why it is important to have regular visits to an ophthalmologist as he/she can detect the reasons for early signs of AMD before a person encounters any vision problems.

Symptoms and Risk Factors

As mentioned above, people may not experience any noticeable signs and symptoms of macular degeneration in its early stages. The symptoms may not get diagnosed until the condition gets worse or affects both the eyes. Some of the common symptoms include –

  • Dark, blurry areas in the center of your vision
  • Worse or less clear vision (Vision may get blurry and it may be difficult for a person to read fine print or drive)
  • Rarely, worse or different color perception

If a person experiences any of these symptoms or a combination of any of these, it is important to consult an ophthalmologist as early as possible. One of the biggest risk factors associated with the condition is age. Other additional risk factors include – smoking, a family history of AMD, high blood pressure, being overweight and consuming a diet high in saturated fat.

Diagnosing and Treating Different Types of AMD

Diagnosis of this eye condition will begin with a detailed eye exam, particularly the retina. Ophthalmologists will look for tiny yellow deposits called “drusen” under the retina, which is an early sign of the disease. As part of the eye exam, the ophthalmologist will ask patients to look at an “Amster Grid” – a pattern of straight lines (like a check board) which helps identify any specific blurry, distorted or blank spots in their field of vision. The ophthalmologist will also look inside the eye through a special lens to study if there are changes in the retina and macula. Dilating eye drops may be used to widen the pupil, as this allows the ophthalmologist to look through a special lens at the inside of the eye. Other screening tests include – fluorescein angiography, optical coherence tomography (OCT) and optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA). An early diagnosis will help ophthalmologists initiate treatment at the right time.

There is no specific cure for this eye condition, but administering certain treatment modalities may help slow the progression of symptoms and keep patients from experiencing severe loss of vision. Treatment options include laser therapy, photodynamic laser therapy, anti-angiogenic drugs and low vision aids. All diagnoses, screening and treatment procedures must be carefully documented using the correct medical codes. Billing and coding services offered by established medical billing and coding companies can ensure the correct codes on the medical claims. ICD-10 diagnosis codes for different types of AMD include –

H35.3 Degeneration of macula and posterior pole

  • H35.30 Unspecified macular degeneration
    • H35.31 Non-exudative age-related macular degeneration
      • H35.311 Non-exudative age-related macular degeneration, right eye
        • H35.3110 Non-exudative age-related macular degeneration, right eye, stage unspecified
        • H35.3111 Non-exudative age-related macular degeneration, right eye, early dry stage
        • H35.3112 Non-exudative age-related macular degeneration, right eye, intermediate dry stage
        • H35.3113 Non-exudative age-related macular degeneration, right eye, advanced atrophic without sub-foveal involvement
        • H35.3114 Non-exudative age-related macular degeneration, right eye, advanced atrophic with sub-foveal involvement
      • H35.312 Non-exudative age-related macular degeneration, left eye
        • H35.3120 Non-exudative age-related macular degeneration, right eye, stage unspecified
        • H35.3121 Non-exudative age-related macular degeneration, right eye, early dry stage
        • H35.3122 Non-exudative age-related macular degeneration, right eye, intermediate dry stage
        • H35.3123 Non-exudative age-related macular degeneration, right eye, advanced atrophic without sub-foveal involvement
        • H35.3124 Non-exudative age-related macular degeneration, right eye, advanced atrophic with sub-foveal involvement
      • H35.313 Non-exudative age-related macular degeneration, bilateral
        • H35.3130 Non-exudative age-related macular degeneration, bilateral, stage unspecified
        • H35.3131 Non-exudative age-related macular degeneration, bilateral, early dry stage
        • H35.3132 Non-exudative age-related macular degeneration, bilateral, intermediate dry stage
        • H35.3133 Non-exudative age-related macular degeneration, bilateral, advanced atrophic without sub-foveal involvement
        • H35.3134 Non-exudative age-related macular degeneration, bilateral, advanced atrophic with sub-foveal involvement
      • H35.319 Non-exudative age-related macular degeneration, unspecified eye
        • H35.3190 Non-exudative age-related macular degeneration, unspecified eye, stage unspecified
        • H35.3191 Non-exudative age-related macular degeneration, unspecified eye, early dry stage
        • H35.3192 Non-exudative age-related macular degeneration, unspecified eye, intermediate dry stage
        • H35.3193 Non-exudative age-related macular degeneration, unspecified eye, advanced atrophic without sub-foveal involvement
        • H35.3194 Non-exudative age-related macular degeneration, unspecified eye, advanced atrophic with sub-foveal involvement
    • H35.32 Exudative age-related macular degeneration
      • H35.321 Exudative age-related macular degeneration, right eye
        • H35.3210 Exudative age-related macular degeneration, right eye, stage unspecified
        • H35.3211 Exudative age-related macular degeneration, right eye, with active choroidal neovascularization
        • H35.3212 Exudative age-related macular degeneration, right eye, with inactive choroidal neovascularization
        • H35.3213 Exudative age-related macular degeneration, right eye, with inactive scar
        • H35.322 Exudative age-related macular degeneration, left eye
        • H35.3220 Exudative age-related macular degeneration, left eye, stage unspecified
        • H35.3221 Exudative age-related macular degeneration, left eye, with active choroidal neovascularization
        • H35.3222 Exudative age-related macular degeneration, left eye, with inactive choroidal neovascularization
        • H35.3223 Exudative age-related macular degeneration, left eye, with inactive scar
      • H35.323 Exudative age-related macular degeneration, bilateral
        • H35.3230 Exudative age-related macular degeneration, bilateral, stage unspecified
        • H35.3231 Exudative age-related macular degeneration, bilateral, with active choroidal neovascularization
        • H35.3232 Exudative age-related macular degeneration, bilateral, with inactive choroidal neovascularization
        • H35.3233 Exudative age-related macular degeneration, bilateral, with inactive scar
        • H35.329 Exudative age-related macular degeneration, unspecified eye
        • H35.3290 Exudative age-related macular degeneration, unspecified eye, stage unspecified
        • H35.3291 Exudative age-related macular degeneration, unspecified eye, with active choroidal neovascularization
        • H35.3292 Exudative age-related macular degeneration, unspecified eye, with inactive choroidal neovascularization
        • H35.3293 Exudative age-related macular degeneration, unspecified eye, with inactive scar

Even though people rarely lose all of their sight from age-related macular degeneration (AMD), they may experience poor central vision. With the severe form of AMD (either wet or dry AMD), the patient’s central vision may decrease to less than 20/200 in both eyes. However, in some cases, even after you get treatment for wet AMD, the condition can come back. Therefore, it is important for patients to test their level of vision on a regular basis and follow the instructions of their ophthalmologist (particularly patients who are above 50 years). The earlier one gets a diagnosis of AMD, the greater will be the chance that treatment will help.

Ophthalmology medical billing and coding can be challenging. Accurate clinical documentation of causes, types, symptoms and other procedures is vital to ensure accuracy in coding and billing. An experienced medical billing company can help physicians assign the right medical codes for this condition, and ensure optimal reimbursement.